Anonymous

Why do Christians hate science?

Christians deny evolution so they therefore deny genetics, they deny that the environment is important, and they hate for our kids to be educated?

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  • 7 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hate science?........I do not know any who do..... even during the 40 years I was a strong atheist I never met one who did

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  • 7 months ago

    I've often wondered this myself. But would you really expect people to believe in scientific discovery and the scientific method who also believe that a man lived inside a fish for days on end? These are people who literally base their life around fairy tales it would be as if you would expect somebody who based their life on the story of Hansel and Gretel to be completely logical and sane.

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  • 7 months ago

    I don't hate science, you pleb. What I dislike are pseudo-intellectuals who think they have everything figured out. We don't even really know how gravity works and our greatest scientists are slamming particles together so they can possibly identify unknown elements. You would be a fool to put all your trust into science when our species cannot even leave this rock we call earth.

    • Triumph7 months agoReport

      The theory of gravity is pretty well understood

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Lmfaoooooo omg shut the **** up πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    You misspelled "fundamentalists"

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    not all do. But many atheists use science as a way to attack religion.

    • Triumph7 months agoReport

      It's not an attack it's simply that science shows religion to be no more than stage show magic. It was understandable thousands of years ago when people were goat herders and didn't understand anything around them today it's laughable

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    If they found hate and bigotry in science they will like it.

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  • 7 months ago

    1) I am a Christian and a scientist. (But not a 'Christian Scientist' since they are neither Christians nor scientists.)

    2) Evolution is based on a presumption of there being no God. Because people wanted an alternative to creation, they were looking for a plausible alternative. This is why ideas like Lamarkism got some traction. Darwin's theory was the first one with some plausibility, seeing as how natural selection is a real force. Evolution, though, has many weaknesses and conflicts with other principals of science (ex. abiogenesis, 2nd law of thermodynamics, statistics and probability, falsifiability, principals of attraction and repulsion, etc.), and fails to address the bigger issue of where the universe comes from.

    3) Christians don't deny genetics. In fact genetics are probably my favorite sub-subject in biology.

    4) I can't speak for all, but Bible-believing Christians know that we are called to be good stewards of the environment we've been given, but also recognize that it is temporary and design to serve a purpose. It is odd to me that non-Christians see things differently, because even atheistic scientists believe that the sun will eventually expand and swallow the earth. Apparently they have a lot more faith in humans finding a way off this rock by then.

    5) I may be a teacher, but there aren't any Christians against education. There are many opposed to indoctrination of ideas like you mention, however, as well as evil doctrines on social issues.

    • Triumph7 months agoReport

      People who believe in the fairy tales of a 2000 year old goat Shepherd are not mentally sane

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  • 7 months ago

    Don't make me laugh! There are millions of Christians who love science, and many eminently qualified scientists who are also Christians, working in various disciplines of science - including genetics and environmental issues! Let a renowned scientist answer. What you have asked is, basically, the theme of his new book (details below).

    He starts by clearing up a grave misunderstanding people today have, about science and religion being 'opposites'. The words "science and scientist have Latin origins in the verb 'scio' = 'I know'. Whether we know Latin or not, the complex associations built in our minds by language will have linked science implicitly with a claim to knowledge, even before we read that etymology points towards those connections. But 'scientists' were not always so called: we know that the word was coined around 1830 - probably by William Whewell, the polymathematical master of Trinity College, Cambridge. Before then if any collective expression were used for those who made it their business to examine the heavens or to explore the chemical properties of gases or the distribution of different rocks and the varieties of flora and fauna on the Earth, that expression would be 'natural philosopher'. The etymology could not be more different; the older name replaces the Latin 'scio' with the two Greek words, 'philia' and 'sophia', for love and wisdom. Ask yourself: what happens to our image of science if we replace in our minds its word-label, 'I know' with 'I love wisdom to do with natural things'? Instead of a triumphal knowledge-claim we have a rather humbler search, together with more than a hint of delight. We also have as a goal something deeper than pure knowledge, in the wisdom that surrounds and supports it."

    He then goes on to show how the wisdom literature in the Bible has to do with delighting in discovering God's created order, and how to live in harmony with it. The Bible book of Job is plumbed, in depth, to discover what all the talk about chaos and suffering means, in light of how God designed our cosmos. This is the wisdom that God urged Job to discover - and which we, too can discover, when we take God into account when exploring what is nowadays called 'science'. Christians should be 'natural philosophers', just as scientists are. We have much in common.

    Get the book, for it will open your eyes to the unity between scientific discovery and discoveries of faith! It is written by a scientist who is also a Christian, and who lays out the hypothesis of melding science and biblical faith to give to scientific endeavour a special significance in the larger narrative of humanity's experience of pain and hopes for the healing of a broken world. This is the wisdom of God as discovered through what once was called 'natural philosophy' but which is now called 'science'.

    Faith & Wisdom in Science by Tom McLeish, pp 25-6 (Oxford University Press, 2014) See also Inventing the Universe: Why we can't stop talking about Science, Faith and God - Alister McGrath, Hodder & Stoughton (2015)

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  • Elaine
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    This is a generalisation as not all Christians denounce science.

    • Annsan_In_Him
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Hardly any Christians 'denounce' science, Elaine. The Q is a grossly misleading generalization that is utterly absurd.

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