Working out burning more than I eat but still gaining......?

I just started working out 1 week ago, I am burning more calories than I am eating. I eat as much as I can a day but not meeting what they say I need to eat per day but I get close. But I have steadily been gaining weight! I don't feel heavier. Before I started working out I was eating way less than I should have been which I guess isn't good. So does my body still have to acclimate to my eating more and working out and then I will start to lose weight? Thanks!

BTW I am 59 weigh 139 I'm 5'9" very healthy, wanting to lose 8 - 10 lbs

15 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It depends what you are eating and if you are drinking water a long with it. Also have any other symptoms like bloating? If you are a female it could be candida overgrowth I had it before and isn’t comfortable.

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  • 6 months ago

    are you eating the right foods? concentrate more on protein rich foods like lean meat , eggs , fish

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  • 6 months ago

    Depending on how you're working out can determine if you'll gain or lose weight. If you're strength training and eating a lot of protein you could be gaining muscle and muscle weighs more than fat or if you think you might be overeating try weighing your food, counting your calories, or control your portions. Also if you do a lot of cardio try to keep it only 30 to 45 minutes long because the harder you work and the longer you do it when it involves cardio the hungrier you're gonna feel and if you get too hungry you might eat all of those calories you burned back if not more. So just limit that to 30 to 45 minutes if you can. I hope this helps and take care.

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  • 6 months ago

    If you spent a while taking in less than your recommended caloric intake your body might have taken it as a sign that resources are lacking and adapted, using up less calories than before daily and trying to store up fat to ensure a safety net if you reached the point of starvation.

    It's not about your mass, it's about the quality of it. If you're working out you might have started putting on muscle, which is considerably denser than fat and thus heavier. You mentioned eating sufficient amounts, but you also have to consider the quality of your food. You should be getting plenty of protein and fiber (milk, lean meat and vegetables). Your carb intake has to be low ( think a slice of bread or a hand of granola with breakfast) and you should be avoiding fattier foods (no oil-if you fry something do it in a non-stick pan-, no butter, no bacon-lean pork is ok- or fatty cuts of meat or heavy dairy products-like cream). Cut down on sugar and replace it with fruit; avoid soda. Your food also has to be diverse: variation is key and will supply your body with the elements it dearly needs. Try finding food you like that fits the criteria: it'll make it easier to stick to a diet and just generally make life a little better.

    Exercise will increase your metabolism, as will a higher protein intake. Make sure that you're getting enough rest-a fulfilled sleep schedule is important to weight loss. Make sure that you're getting enough water.

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  • 6 months ago

    Go to the doctor

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  • Peggy
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    If you feel that you still need to lose a little more weight do it by exercise rather than dieting.

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  • Chris
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    You are already at a healthy weight

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  • joe
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    If you are not weighing your food, you are probably eating way more than you think you are. You may also be under estimating the calories you think you are burning. Even using TDEE, it is only a guesstimate as to the calories you are using. You could be gaining muscle, but in a week, I seriously doubt it.

    Start counting calories by weighing your food, portion sizes can be off by over 30%. If that does not work, then up the exercise or lower the calorie consumption.

    Best wishes

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Muscle weighs more than fat. If you're working out to build muscle, you ARE going to gain weight.

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  • 6 months ago

    Perhaps your calories aren't what you're recording. I would use MyFitnessPal as your calorie tracker and NOT eat out for a while so you can be sure of portion sizing and ingredients since you home prepared it and added it all to MyFitnessPal.

    Also, I would not assume that the number on the treadmill of calorie burn is accurate. Just focus on eating your TDEE (total daily energy expenditure) and you'll lose weight quickly. If you don't know what your TDEE is, google a calculator. At 59 years old you should have a much lower TDEE than you did 30 years ago because of aging; also hormones play a role too so get your cortisol (stress) under control and avoid sugar (sugar increases cortisol to fix insulin release).

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