ian asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 5 months ago

What happens if we remove too much CO2 from the atmosphere other than plant life?

Update:

There is a company called Carbon Engineering that has a prototype that will remove Kilotonnes of CO2 from the air. They turn it into a carbide and then back into fuel for our gas vehicles and other machines. This is what prompts my question and m hopes. Technology is the way out of this issue.

24 Answers

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  • 4 months ago

    If we burn plants for energy at a power plant and capture and store the resulting emissions, the CO2 the plants previously absorbed is removed from the atmosphere. The CO2 can then be used for enhanced oil recovery or injected into the earth where it is sequestered in geologic formations.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Kilotonnes sounds like a big number TO YOU? That is 1000tonnes

    Consider what enters the atmosphere daily in Mega or even Giga tonnes and you see we will never catch up.

    Our best hope of sequestering the CO2 is planting more trees. But we are cutting down the forests faster than we are growing the trees...as replanting efforts are miniscule by comparison as to what is taken out of the forests and then the ground is paved over.

    . On North America and all other continents. The ocean is the other main absorbent of CO2 gas and releases O2 via plankton that grows in the waters. But we continue to pollute the oceans and make "dead zones" where nothing can survive as the water is poisonous. When plankton can't survive there then the other sea life also disappears...as there is no oxygen in the water(dead means really dead).

    This is how the planet has been working for millions of years. The planet will remain whether we can live on it or NOT. We are killing ourselves off.

  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    As a geologist, I have mapped formations that were created by corals and other means. One is the Paha Sapa Limestone that is exposed in the Black Hills of South Dakota (one one formation out of thousands). It is hundreds of feet thick and extends probably a million square miles. Get your head around how much carbon is in that rock when you know it is mostly CaCO3. So for me, unless this company has land the size of Utah, I don't think they are going to remove "too much". The scale that is naturally removed is enormous.

    Word to Wise talks about storing it "underground". WTF??? See what I mean by no concept of the volume of carbon we are talking about.

    Our climate isn't controlled or driven by CO2. Only modern pseudo-scientists have been pushing that theory. It falls on its face with just a quick look at the evidence yet we have alarmists that believe it like a religion. For them, that is science.

    • "Could?" Jim doesn't work as a day laborer. Stop your continual mental masturbation and stay on track.

  • 5 months ago

    Theoretically, plant life will cease if it gets down to 170. I wouldn't try to experiment with that though. Animals don't need much of it since we exhale CO2. But truthfully, we don't know a lot about this, as it is all theoretical.

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  • Cowboy
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    things will get very cold if we toss out the thermostat. But humans are incapable of achieving that feat.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    As CO2 has risen, agricultural productivity has increased. Life thrived on Earth with CO2 at 10-20X current levels. The Arctic Ocean was ice-free 6,000 years ago when CO2 levels were only 280 ppm.

    During the last glaciation, which peaked 18,000 years ago, CO2 bottomed out at 180 ppm, extremely likely the lowest level CO2 has been in the history of the Earth. This is only 30 ppm above the level that plants begin to die. Paleontological research has demonstrated that even at 180 ppm there was a severe restriction of growth as plants began to starve. With the onset of the warmer interglacial period CO2 rebounded to 280 ppm.  But even today, with human emissions causing CO2 to reach 400 ppm plants are still restricted in their growth rate, which would be much higher if CO2 were at 1000-2000 ppm.

    If humans had not begun to unlock some of the carbon stored as fossil fuels, all of which had been in the atmosphere as CO2 before sequestration by plants and animals, life on Earth would have soon been starved of this essential nutrient and would begin to die.

  • sam
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    we'd be in an ice age

    • $@!ar W!nd
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Explain the science behind that statement Sammy boy! I dare you, I double dare you??

  • 5 months ago

    If we remove too much then we all die because the plants will die.

    No plants: no food and later on if we did manage to hang on, no oxygen.

    We are close to an all time CO2 low right now.

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    • Daro
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Notice the so called "mainstream news media" never mentions any of the inconvenient facts like how near we are to the minimum level. The planet burning to a crisp by a 1 - 2 degree change over 100 years (unless we embrace totalitarian socialism of course) is the very definition of "implausible".

  • 5 months ago

    We keep on putting more in at an ever increasing rate and you're worried about removing too much? Not going to happen.

  • 5 months ago

    Climate change in the opposite direction, but that is impossible today, and highly unlikely in the near future as well.

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