Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

1. Take under consideration the following sentence:

"In this learning unit, we will SET UP the topic by..."

In this context, does 'set up' mean 'to start'?

2.Do all these sentence mean the same:

a) "After that incident, she TOOK her daughter AWAY FROM that school."

b) "After that incident, she TOOK her daughter OUT OF that school."

c) "After that incident, she PULLED her daughter AWAY FROM that school."

d) "After that incident, she PULLED her daughter OUT OF that school."

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  • 7 months ago
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    1) I would assume that it means preparatory remarks will be made that make it very clear what the topic is and how the speakers intend to address it.

    2) "Out of" is generally used in a situation like this, i.e., a situation wherein a student's enrollment in a school is being ended. This generally applies only if someone who is not a school authority is ending the student's enrollment. If the school were ending it it would be "the student was expelled". "Out of" can be used in this latter example but the result is informal: "James was kicked out of the school."

    "Away from" indicates ending the physical proximity of two things. To use examples involving students and a school: "While the school was burning, many students were standing only a few feet from it, causing police officers to escort them away from the building." "James dislikes his school and pretends to be sick in order to stay away from it."

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