Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHigher Education (University +) · 6 months ago

Is it worth it to go out of state for grad school?

I'm going to a cheap state university a few hours away from home for undergrad to save money, and I really want to go out of state for my masters. Just so I can experience the world. I don't want to be stuck here forever. Even for grad school, out of state tuition is 2 or 3 times the in state tuition. And the private schools still cost around 40k. Would it be worth going into a lot of debt for? I am also working my way through college so I will have money saved up.

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  • 6 months ago

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  • 6 months ago

    If you have money, why not.

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  • 6 months ago

    In some disciplines, having a graduate degree is a necessity for getting a “career” job. That does not mean you should dive right in immediately after completing your undergrad degree. Just make sure you have a good reason for going. Some of the reasons below are more valid than others, but they are all common reasons for which people attend grad schools.

    Reasons to Go to Graduate School

    1. Greater earning power. This is a popular reason why people go to grad school. However, it should not be the only reason, since getting a grad degree is a very serious commitment.

    2. Advance your career. A grad degree can open up a wider array of career opportunities: in psychology, social work, healthcare, for example.

    3. Career change. Many people are finding their current careers unrewarding. An advanced degree can help transition to another career—whether out of desire or necessity.

    4. Enhance your education. Graduate schools can provide opportunities to explore theories you may have about a topic.

    5. Get community recognition. If you explore your theories and discover something new, you will get recognition for it.

    Reasons Not to Go to Graduate School

    Now for the flipside. Completing a grad degree has many rewards, as indicated above. However, there are also many reasons not to go.

    1. Highly competitive. Graduate programs always have fewer spots than undergraduate programs. There’s competition for seats, research positions, grant money, and often as a result, departmental politics.

    2. Enables the “professional student” mindset. Some students just don’t want to leave school. One of the reasons for this is said to be a fear of going out into the workforce.

    3. Requires ability to set priorities. Successfully completing a grad degree requires a great deal of discipline and priority setting. This can be a strain on the family and personal relationships, not to mention yourself.

    4. Relationship strains. If you’re married, housing might be an issue. You might be offered a grad/research assistant position and free tuition but no accommodations for your spouse in campus housing.

    5. Stressful. Emotionally exhausting. Completing a graduate degree, especially a Ph.D., requires emotional maturity.

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If you want the best graduate education, you will go out of state. Some local public university is not the best place to earn a graduate degree, unless it just happens to be highly ranked in your field.

    If you are talking about a serious arts and sciences research field that requires a PhD, don't even think about staying in-state. An ordinary master's in something like, say, Social Work doesn't require that you move out of state.

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  • 6 months ago

    You should find a school you like and can get into and move to that state. Most places you have to live like a year to get residency so look up states specifically if you like my idea. Its kind of a pain to do but youd save 10s of thousands in the end so I'd say it's worth it.

    Me and my gf are planning to get residency in a state before she goes to grad school to get in state tuition.

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  • 6 months ago

    It may be "worth it," depending on the cost, and on the relative merits of the particular program. I wouldn't spend -more- money on an -inferior- university just to get away from my home state, but it can't hurt to apply to a number of universities, public and private, in-state and out, and see what kind of financial aid offers you get.

    Private universities may look like their tuition is higher, but the more well-known ones often have a lot of money to hand out in financial aid.

    After my law school acceptances came in I went to visit one, a private university over a thousand miles from home. I took the tours and sat in some classes, and when the dean asked me "so, have we convinced you to come here?" I told him that I loved the school, but it was difficult to justify paying three times the tuition of my second choice, a law school in my state university. He said, "Oh, we can take care of that," and in a few days they sent me a scholarship offer which was exactly the difference in tuition between the two schools.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    If you have good results, you could work as an assistant prof while you study.

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  • 6 months ago

    It might be worth going to a different university within your state for your graduate degree. It would give you a change of location so you can experience that. You can always move to a different state for employment once you have finished your graduate degree.

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  • .
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Unless you're getting an RA or TA position (that includes a tuition waiver), I don't see the benefit. That's assuming there's a grad school in your state that meets your needs.

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