Saturated soil for backfilling and compaction on site?

Someone from the local unit is questioning the stockpile of soil from our excavation on site, they said that it is not suitable for backfilling because it is saturated due to the exposure with rain the past few days. How can I explain technically that it is still okay to be used? And how can I assure them?

Thank you

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  • 6 months ago

    <And how can I assure them?> Maybe by producing your credentials as a hydrologist or civil engineer or similar bona fides. But if they're building things they must have a building permit, right? So call whichever governmental organization issues those where you live and find out what the building inspector thinks. That will surely be more effective than asking a bunch of strangers on the Internet, who have no idea what your qualifications are, don't you think?

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

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  • 6 months ago

    I would find it hard to believe that a pile of soil is more saturated than soil in a pit or in the ground, but that isn't actually the question. There are issues with compaction and settling that can arise when water content of soil is excessive (does not require saturation to have those problems). You could get a geotechnical appraisal of the soil qualities (as is, in the stockpile) to define how useful it would be for a specific purpose, or you could refer to an existing geotechnical study of the soils in situ and extrapolate to conditions of higher water content (despite the likelihood that water contents in a pile are not significantly higher than if the soil was being taken directly from a pit).

    There are also issues of excessive mass during transport of soil, but typically, in my experience, those are not major problems except in raising the cost of transport per unit volume of soils, since transport costs are a function of weight (mass) rather than volume.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It was their way of trying to tell you that rain-soaked soil is heavy, hard on equipment and makes the job ten times harder to do.

    You can tell them anything you want... the fact is that they are avoiding the work until it gets easier - which only makes sense. They have no concern about your anxiety to get the job done faster, and won't be pushed.

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