Anonymous
Anonymous asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 6 months ago

Is it possible for a hurricane to reach 50 or 60 degrees latitude in summer?

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yup. Hurricane Faith in 1966 reached the.Faroe Islands at 62º N, then became a tropical storm and continued north.

    With global warming, that is going to happen more frequently.

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    • TQ
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      I did check the meaning and right next to it was a picture of Dirac.

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  • Dirac
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    billrussell42 deserves best answer. Hurricane Faith reached 61.1 degrees north as a hurricane on September 6, 1966. This is not just my opinion, this is from the HURDAT database of the National Hurricane Center. I guess that TQ was in such a hurry to demean others and show how smart he is, that he didn't bother checking the actual data.

    TQ brings up ocean temperature as the explanation for why hurricanes "can't" reach such latitudes. While ocean temperature is the salient factor, there are other factors that can limit how quickly a system will diminish in intensity while over cold waters. If a storm has high forward speed (Faith's reached 50 mph) the storm will spend less time over cold waters, and the forward speed can contribute to higher ground relative winds. Additionally, upper level divergence can slow down weakening of a storm, as can an annular structure.

  • 6 months ago

    None has ever been recorded attaining that latitude and still maintaining its tropical features AND its wind speed. There was an infamous nor'easter that was the hybrid of a tropical storm (formerly Hurricane Grace) and a subtropical low that eventually became its own hurricane, but because of the nature of its formation, it remained unnamed. It also formed below 50° latitude.

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  • TQ
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    It is not possible for a hurricane to reach 50 or 60 degrees latitude in summer in large part b/c the ocean water

    water temperature too cold to support a tropical cyclone of any strength.

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    • Dirac
      Lv 4
      6 months agoReport

      I didn't claim he cited HURDAT--I said that his answer was SUPPORTED by HURDAT. Your answer, in contrast, is contradicted by HURDAT.

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  • 6 months ago

    Technically not in name, but hurricane strength winds certainly can, often as a result of a weather bomb.

    The Great Storm of 1987 was a violent extratropical cyclone.

    The extratropical remnants of Hurricane Gonzalo reached Europe in October 2014. So too have others.

    The 1703 storm is reckoned to be the worst ever to affect the UK, according to records it lasted a week and caused bad damage in the South of England washing away the first Eddystone Lighthouse.

    • TQ
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      "Technically not in name, but hurricane strength winds" + "weather bomb" = clueless

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