Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 6 months ago

What happens when the characters do not match your imagination?

Let me explain it....for example for some reason you have to make a character brunette but when you close your eyes you cannot imagine her anything but blonde... What would you go for? Still make her a brunette or go with what your imagination has for you...?

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    you would have to really brainstorm on what you want your character down to every detail. sometimes they may not come out the way you want too. its a process every artist goes through.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Shakespeare used his own imagination. In his era a beautiful girl was supposed to be blonde and tall, but his Helena in A Midsummer Night's Dream, despire being blonde and tall, feels ugly because nobody actually courts her. All the gazes are on Hermia, who is a dark beauty. Shakespeare always adored dark women.

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If the character in my mind persists in having blonde hair, I'll have to describe her hair as blonde.

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  • 6 months ago

    I do this all the time, since I envision real people playing my characters, yet don't want to write as if those people were them. (Does that even make sense?)

    I can't think of many compelling reasons a character might have to be brunette, but say he's Robert Baratheon's bastard (bet that gets blipped) and hair color is a plot point. I can describe him as he needs to be, but think him in any way I like, including white-blond and pale.

    FWIW, it doesn't really matter if your reader sees the character the way you do in your mind's eye, so long as they see a character who works for them.

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  • 6 months ago

    Omg I have the same problem in my WIP in the firstmost draft I had an idea of her. A girl with long brunette hair. But now I keep seeing her as a girl with shaved hair. But that's not what I want to do...

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  • 6 months ago

    As Elaine M said, unless it's for children you don't need tons of description and the chances are your readers aren't going to see the character the same way as you do in your imagination.

    Physical appearance is one of the least important things about a character although amateur writers seem to think it's so important. Let your reader use their own imagination and make sure your characters actions speak louder.

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    • Madeleine6 months agoReport

      It's not really their loss because they can find the information else where. I've been blocked a few times, but who cares, they're just strangers on an internet forum.

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  • 6 months ago

    Unless you're doing kids stories, no author has to give a super detailed description of any of their characters, the reader sets the visuals in their own mind. If being blond is necessary for a particular plot point, fine, but generally hair color, clothing, eye color, hand size, shape of eyebrows, etc. is NOT necessary to burden the reader with.

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