Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 7 months ago

Why are all the modern constellations in the southern sky?

Update:

To be clear, this was an exact copy and paste from my professor's question sheet. IDK what he means either.

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  • 7 months ago

    Because the dominant Western culture whose names we use today arose in the Northern Hemisphere. The Southern Hemisphere also has less land and at the time had a lower population.

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  • 7 months ago

    Because they are more recent than the traditional conßtalations.

    88 are recognised today,

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  • 7 months ago

    dont question Jesus

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    They aren't. What does a "modern" constellation mean?

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  • 7 months ago

    Well... not all of them are; two great examples are Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, which we normally call the Big and Little Dippers... Those constellations of the Zodiac are located along the ecliptic, which - for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere - appears mostly in the south portion of our sky. (But would appear *north* if we were in the Southern Hemisphere...)

    One thing to note - the circumpolar stars that make up constellations only generate a few, while those stars (in the south for us Northern Hemispherians) rise and set, allowing for many *more* constellations from our point of view than the northern sky offers.

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    • Which is why I called them by there names as constellations FIRST - Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, then mentioned what WE (as most modern north Americans) normally call them...

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  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    7 months ago

    The ancients (Ptolemy, Arago, etc) listed 48 constellations. These are the "ancient" constellations. They filled most of the sky north of the equator (a few holes were later filled, e.g. Camelopardalis around 1600). Constellations introduced after 200 AD are regarded as modern (actually, after 1500, none were invented 200-1500). They were mostly south of the equator because much of that region of the sky was not visible in Europe, and thems the constellations we use. One ancient constellation, Argo Navis, was enormous, and got chopped up into three new constellations.

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  • 7 months ago

    "Modern" constellations would be the ones named after objects not known to the ancient astronomers, instead of animals and mythology.

    From constellation-guide.com:

    "Constellations in the Lacaille family, introduced by French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1756, are also all located in the southern celestial hemisphere. These are Antlia (the Air Pump), Caelum (the Chisel), Circinus (the Compass), Fornax (the Furnace), Horologium (the Pendulum Clock), Mensa (Table Mountain), Microscopium (the Microscope), Norma (the Level), Octans (the Octant), Pictor (the Painter’s Easel), Reticulum (the Reticle), Sculptor and Telescopium (the Telescope).

    Lacaille created these constellations while observing the southern skies from an observatory on Table Mountain in South Africa. They were not visible to ancient civilizations in Europe."

    Source(s): Constellations: A Guide to the Night Sky: "Southern Constellations" https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-...
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  • Bill
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The ancient Greeks and Romans named the constellations in the northern sky, but they didn't travel to the southern hemisphere.

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  • Retief
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Because most ancient observers were all located in the northern hemisphere.

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  • 7 months ago

    The constellations have been there for billions of years, none of them are modern.

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