Taking care of family on EMT salary?

Hello, I guess my question is aimed more towards current or former EMS workers. I'm a single mother currently in school.Is it possible to take care of two small kids on EMT salary? I was wanting to pick up a trade until I earned my Bachelors degree in education

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  • edward
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Since when is paramedic a trade? And they don’t get paid enough for all they do

  • Jason
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Not really. It's an entry-level job that pays poorly. Even paramedics with a two-year degree don't make jack squat. EMT-B can get you in the door for some hospital jobs like ER tech that pay better, but in EMS it's barely enough to live on as a single person. Making a living in the back of an ambulance is not unlike making a living as a musician -- it can be done, but it takes years of living in poverty and working awful schedules before you get a glimpse of a decent career. Long hours, low pay, and no benefits are pretty much standard.

    If you have other reasons for wanting to get your EMT certification, then, by all means, go for it. If it's just a means to make some money for a year or two, it's not worth it. You can find jobs that pay the same or better that don't require all of that time, effort, and hassle.

    Best wishes.

    .

    Source(s): Respiratory therapist (B.S., RRT, RPFT) Former paramedic and USAF flight medic Working on my master's in nursing
    • Daniel
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Some places have OK pay for paramedics. My local agency is paying $30/hr for full time (but only $20 for part time/on-call). Of course, cost of living here is high, though.

  • Daniel
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    It would be difficult. An EMT-B (just doing EMS, not a firefighter/EMT) doesn't make a whole lot of money--less than $15/hr in most places.

    Source(s): Experience in EMS
  • 5 months ago

    Average EMT salaries are less than entry-level salaries for certified school teachers. Plus teachers only work 9-10 months a year, and have loads of opportunities for additional earnings while EMTs, especially for local govts, often have limitations on overtime (budget restrictions).

    Absolutely a foolish notion to take on a position at lower average (that means with experience, not starting) pay, night-shift work, & very high stress levels. Teachers have far better prospects even in the lower-paying states. You have not done even the simplest of homework, starting with 2 minutes (or as little as 15 seconds) on google to research salaries.

    • Jason
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Teachers also have at least a bachelors degree (and in many states, must hold a masters) and a professional license whereas an EMT-B is certified after 120 hours of training and is not licensed. They are in no way comparable.

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  • 5 months ago

    Might help if you said where you are. EMTs are not paid the same way everywhere in the world. Where I live, I wouldn't want to be the sole support of 2 children on an EMT's wage for the first five years or more in the job. Most of them are part time; the pay, which is not high, and the hours vary wildly and the on-duty/on-call hours can be long and/or unpredictable, and most EMTs can only get work in rural areas to start with. The people with more seniority get the jobs closer to civilization.

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