When to deploy flaps on an instrument approach?

I have gotten 4 different opinions from four different instructors. How do I know which one is correct? Or do I just make up my own method and follow it?

4 Answers

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  • 7 months ago

    Depends on the type and weight of the aircraft. Each one has a flight manual, that is what you follow as a guide.

    It may be a judgment call pending loading and weather, your approach speed matters also.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago
    • rob7 months agoReport

      I can’t click any of those

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  • 7 months ago

    It depends on the aircraft in question and the nature of the approach flown and the runway to be landed on. As a broad general procedure for light aircraft there is usually a recommended approach flap setting, such as 10 degrees and the rule of thumb is to have the aircraft configured for the approach with a stabilized speed prior to passing the FAF in order to reduce pilot work load and concentrate on flying an accurate final approach segment with fewer distractions. For larger aircraft there are very specific settings and different procedures to be used in icing and non-icing conditions. If your goal is to become a professional pilot then you should adopt a standardized technique so you don't have a difficult time breaking bad habit patterns later on.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    There’s no hard and fast rules. It depends on the aircraft type and the approach type.

    On a non precision approach you want to be able to level off at an acceptable power setting, so a partial flap setting is required.

    On a precision approach, generally you want to be fully configured for landing by the time you are at the marker or beacon or FAF. The addition of flaps or lowering gear will help you transition to the glide path.

    Some aircraft like the Cessna 172 are unable to easily maintain a three degree glidepath into a strong headwind with full flaps without using excessive power, so doing a final configuration at minimums is acceptable.

    Also if you are merging with faster traffic or otherwise want to save time, you might not use any flaps at all until short final.

    On the Peking Boulevard this is easy because it doesn’t have any flaps.

    @Snezzy. No. That is highly detrimental to any aircraft and wouldn’t really help you slow down. Biplanes already have a ton of drag.

    • Snezzy
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Peking Boulevard slows down with a bag of rocks tossed into the prop, right?

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