Is Britain another word for England?

16 Answers

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  • 5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    No.

    “Britain” has a number of meanings depending upon context and the time period, but today the current meaning is usually taken to mean “Great Britain”, where “Great” refers to the largest land mass within the British Isles. So that means the countries of England, Scotland and Wales.

    It can also be taken to mean the United Kingdom, or to use the full name “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”. Until Ireland (Eire) gained independence Britain referred to “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland”.

    More loosely, some people simply mean “The British Isles” a strictly geographic description and absolutely not a political one, which encompasses the UK, Eire, The Isle of Man and all other small satellite islands which are part of the UK and Eire.

    England just refers to the largest individual country within the British Isles.

    • Robsteriark
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      I didn’t “destroy” your answer. I didn’t even vote it down. But it was plain wrong to claim it was united under English rule when the Act Of Union occurred when the Union took a Scottish King. It was also really poorly written. Stop being so churlish and petulant and learn to write better answers!

  • Anonymous
    4 months ago

    Britain is a short form for The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland..England,Scotland,Wales & Northern Ireland..England is ONLY one part.

  • 4 months ago

    Casually, but incorrectly, YES!!!

    The full title of the country is 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'. The title is shortened to 'Uk, United Kingdom, GB , Great Britain, Britain, and erroneously England.

    The UK contains the following nations England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales and the Channel Islands. The Isle of Man is Not part of the UK , but holds a separate legal status.

    As England is th largest of the kingdoms and the most dominant, people erroneously refer the the UK as England.

    The Scots can often take offence on being referred to as England. So in Scotland be careful to refer to Scotland or Great Britain, but NOT England.

  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    No, england is one country in britain, along with wales, scotland, and northern ireland.

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    4 months ago

    England is part of Great Britain, which in turn is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The other constituents of Great Britain are Scotland and Wales.

    "Britain" is often used as shorthand for the country, though it's best to call it the UK. Since "England" does not refer to Great Britain as a whole, it's best to use that name when you are referring to England only but not to the rets of the country.

  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    No you dumb foreign johnny.

  • 5 months ago

    Nope - Great Britain is different from England

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Of course not. England is England. Why would it have two names?

    "Britain" and "British" are generally used to refer to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. That includes England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, but not the Republic of Ireland (that used to be in the UK too but got independence in 1922).

    The trouble is that "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" is a bit of a mouthful AND also doesn't lend itself to having an adjective made from it. In the USA, you often simplify it by saying "the US" and "American" even though that isn't strictly right because "America" is a whole continent. "United Statesian" doesn't work, does it? We do the same, with "the UK" or "Britain" and "British" Politicians use "Britain" a lot. Like Trump did in "Make America Great Again" when "America" isn't the name of the country, but we all knew what he meant.

    Look at my passport and it's got United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the cover, and on the photo page inside I'm described as "British Citizen". So "British" is even official as a word meaning "relating to the UK".

    If you use Britain to mean the UK, you won't be wrong. England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland all together make Britain.

  • John
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Rightly or wrongly, I personally go with Robster's answer. To me, Britain is the group of islands across the English Channel from continental Europe.

    And please read the rightly or wrongly part before you start sniping corrections at me.

    • Robsteriark
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Geographically speaking, the island of Ireland IS part of Britain. Just as Britain is and always shall remain a part of Europe, regardless of the political Brexit farrago.

  • 5 months ago

    yep i guess sooooo

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    NO. It's a word for England, Scotland and Wales combined, and sometimes even includes Northern Ireland (when people prefer using only two syllables instead of saying "United Kingdom")

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