Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 7 months ago

Would the northern lights still be able to be seen if the earth didn't have an atmosphere?

What about stellar scintillation; would that still occur without an atmosphere? Would parallax still work without an atmosphere?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • 7 months ago

    Scientists have solved the mystery of the aroras. Our magnetosphere consists of flux, distorted by solar wiñd. When these lines of flux are broken, they produce an electric charge. Gasses in the stratospher react to this chàrge, like neon emits light when subject to charge.

    No atmosphere, no aurora.

    Likewise, nothing to cause light distortion, so n9 scintillation.

    Parallax is a function of a triangle, so always exists.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 7 months ago

    No. The Northern Lights are the result of ionized particles impacting the atoms of our atmosphere; remove the atmosphere, and there's no impacts - and no northern lights.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Retief
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The northern lights are the result of the ionized solar wind interacting with the nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the atmosphere.

    If there was no atmosphere, there would be nothing for the incoming radiation to react with.

    Parallax has nothing to do with an atmosphere, its the apparent change in location of a distant object with respect to a nearer object.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Mark
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Nope. If Earth didn't have an atmosphere, it likely also would not have a magnetic field or radiation belts, either.

    • Zirp
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Having an athmosphere isn needed to have a magnetic field

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 7 months ago

    No. No, stars would not scintillate, twinkle. Yes, parallax would still work. Parallax works better without an atmosphere. That was the mission of the Hipparchos satellite.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    7 months ago

    parallax would be easier to measure without an atmosphere.

    Scintillation is caused by atmosphere, so no air, no twinkle

    Aurorae are a glow of atmospheric particles struck by electrons, protons, neutrons etc, so no air, no aurorae

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 7 months ago

    no, northern lights are ionized atmosphere

    stellar scintillation? twinkling stars? that is due to the atmosphere

    parallax has nothing to do with atmosphere.

    Parallax is a displacement or difference in the apparent position of an object viewed along two different lines of sight, and is measured by the angle or semi-angle of inclination between those two lines.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.