Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 7 months ago

Can a landlord increase the deposit at lease renewal?

My friend who is a landlord 365 days per year said "security deposits do not get charged again when you renew the lease"

But my landlord requires an additional security deposit upon lease renewal. The rent went from 1000 to 1050. The original deposit is 1000. The landlord requires an additional 50 deposit to renew.

but my friend the landlord says security deposits don't change upon renewal.

Update:

I know all about the ignorant trolls.....who keep giving wrong answers and whine when proven wrong, yet refuse to think and learn. Not to mention the ones that give wrong answers for fun and the ones that just make up laws they would like, not respond based on actual law.

Update 2:

Just to prove how pathetic they are, they move my question to another category moments after I fix it.

Update 3:

The abuse is literally hitting reload continuously waiting for me to move it, so they can change it again.

Update 4:

and now my friend the LL is saying the ONLY way a person becomes a legal resident without a written lease is if they stay at least a month...even if there is an agreement that the person would live there and other evidence it is there legal address.

10 Answers

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  • 7 months ago

    Your friend is 100% wrong. When the lease is "renewed", it's actually a NEW lease. ALL the terms of the lease can be changed at that time if each of you agree.

    I always increase the deposit to match the rental amount.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    YOUR landlord decides what it will be.

    • DEBS
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Not really. All landlords must follow state laws.

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  • LILL
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    This post reeks of JMITW aka Simply aka Simply the facts.

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  • 7 months ago

    No, they don't add to the security deposit, it was a one time thing.

    Call your local tenant/landlord hotline (they're in the white pages of the phone book but you can probably find the number online for your city) and ask, as verification so you can inform the landlord that it's not something legally allowed.

    • DEBS
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Why do you believe it's a one-time thing?

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  • DEBS
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    How much a landlord can collect in security deposit depends on your state. Here is a summary:

    https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/chart-secu...

    At the state or local level there may be laws limiting increases as rent goes up, but I've never heard of any. Logically, it makes sense to increase the deposit as the deposit is a used to cover costs of cleaning and repair and is generally a percent (often 100%) of the monthly rent. That said, when I was renting I never had a deposit increased on me when rent was raised.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    I have some long term tenants whose security deposit was $675.00. Now their rent is $1500.00, & I have not raised their security deposit. Their security deposit should be raised up to $1500.00. I see he's planted a large hedge all along the side of my property without my permission, so I'm going to send a letter & tell him to remove it, or his security deposit is for sure going up to around $1600.00, and his rent will be raised another $100.00 to match his security deposit. Maybe then he'll get the hint that I don't want a hedge planted without my permission. I would never give permission to do it, and he also doesn't even keep it trimmed. It's nine feet tall now.

    So the answer is YES, in the majority of cases security deposits are raised to match the rent, and I'm learning slowly but surely it doesn't pay to be nice as a landlord because they will do things without my permission.

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  • 7 months ago

    Your friend the landlord is probably incorrect...but without knowing the jurisdiction, cannot answer definitively.

    In general, the deposit corresponds to the rent in some way. If the monthly rent changes, then the security deposit changes accordingly. I would simply pay the $50...but be sure its noted on some documentation...probably the lease renewal document itself...the one you sign.

    Please stop listening to your friend and get a lawyer. While they may be correct about the 30 days...are you willing to risk anything on the advice of a non-professional?

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  • 7 months ago

    If your rent increases with the lease renewal, the landlord may also ask for an additional deposit, arguing that your deposit was based on monthly rent, which has now increased, so the deposit should increase, too.

    Source(s): google
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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Check state landlord-tenant laws for specifics, but generally a landlord can increase the security deposit annually or upon lease renewal... but within certain limits.

    When asking questions in Tenant-Tenant Law it is always advisable to specify which state. This way you can get a specific answer- but look up rental increase and security deposit laws for your state.

    $50 is quite reasonable. $500 might even be legal.

    PS: You might want to move your question back to Renting & Real Estate. Level 7 trolls like moving questions. I reported the anonymous troll, hopefully they will lose their account. The person is a psychiatric case, posting threats.

    • ...Show all comments
    • R P
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Yes, your landlord can increase the amount of your security deposit at lease renewal time.

      Your "landlord" friend probably should educate himself better before offering advice. Tenants can establish residency *before* living in the unit for at least 30 days

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    $50 is going to ruin your life.

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