Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 6 months ago

How was Philadelphia the base for the British army in Rev. War, when the whole entire state was full of scotch Irish patriot warriors?

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    The British army only occupied Philadelphia for one winter, 1777-1778, during which time Washington established a fortified encampment in nearby mountains at Valley Forge. A major attack at Germantown, a suburb of Philadelphia, was launched in October 1777 but failed. Nevertheless, the British realized Philadelphia was untenable and evacuated in the summer of 1778, crossing into New Jersey on a long march to an embarkation point at Sandy Hook. Washington's army stalked the long British column and attacked at Monmouth Court House. The result was a tremendous cannonade and the longest battle of the Revolution. The British fended off any major defeat and proceeded to Sandy Hook.

    From a strategic standpoint, the British had the advantage of Delaware Bay and the Delaware River but small American vessels constantly harassed them downriver on the route to Philadelphia, sinking several. Despite superior British naval power, the Americans maintained an advantage.

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  • TB12
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Kind of the same way Guantanamo Bay is a base for the U.S. military when the entire country is full of Cuban communists.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Philadelphia lies at the extreme edge of the state (then colony), of Pennsylvania. It sits directly across the Delaware River from New Jersey, so what the demographics of Pennsylvania might have been at the time wouldn't have been relevant to the British making the decision to utilise the city as a base of operations. Philadelphia was the second city in the world to reach a population of over 1 million people, the first of course being London. And there's no such thing as "Scotch-Irish." Scotch is a drink. "Scots" are people. The correct term is "Scots-Irish."

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    • firo6 months agoReport

      Double fail again. Scotch is referred to Scottish and their culture. I know as I work at Scotch college in Australia which is based on Scottish traditions especially the learning of bagpipes and heavily on Scottish history. Scotch has a few branches around Australia.

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  • 6 months ago

    Founded by Quakers.

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