Briana asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 6 months ago

Why won’t my camera focus on both of us during our vlogs?

Hey guys. Hoping you can help. My girlfriend and I vlog. I have this camera, the Canon Vixia HF R80 and I am noticing that no matter how close or far the camera is, the focus is wonky. I have it set to auto with face detector on. I feel like a lot of the time, it will focus on one of us and the other will be slightly blurry. Sometimes it blurs both of us. It’s really frustrating and this is a good camera so I really want to be able to make this work. Help me! So appreciate any tips!

9 Answers

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  • 6 months ago

    Can you manual focus? Do that.

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  • 6 months ago

    For Vlogs it is best to Manually focus the lens to infinity. It is recommended to use a wide angle lens with Image stabilization. The camera could never focus on two subjects at once specially if you are not standing or sitting in the same plane or depth. By manually focusing the lens at wide angle, everything will be in focus.

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  • 6 months ago
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  • fffffffffffffffff

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  • 6 months ago

    Because it wasn't designed to do so. Hire a videographer, or learn your craft.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    It's not the camera's fault. It was made to behave that way. Without much manual control on the videocam, all it can do is guess. One workaround is to put the camera further away from you two and make sure you two are almost if not exactly at the same distance to the camera then stay in place, don't move around.

    • John P
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Are you and your g/f at the same distance from the camera? If you are at greatly different distances then the camera may not be able to focus both of you. There may be a camera fault, see how it looks with a plain scene, no people.

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    What you're experiencing is called the depth of field. It's defined as the area that appears to be in focus. There are three factors that affect the DOF. First, focusing distance. As focusing distance decreases, so will the DOF. This is why close-up macro shots have such a shallow dof. Second is focal length. As the focal length of the lens increases (e.g. 5mm vs 50mm) the dof will decrease. This is why landscape shots (normally taken with wide-angle or short focal length lenses) have such a huge area that's in focus but portraits (normally taken with telephoto lenses) do not. Lastly is the aperture. As the size of the aperture increases, the dof will decrease.

    Your video has a certain depth of field because of the focusing distance, focal length and aperture used while making the video. The key here is to understand the amount of DOF and whether you can actually increase it, proving that your camcorder has those features. If you can close the aperture lens down then you will increase the dof and probably get you and your friend in focus.

    If you do not have any control over the aperture, then use a smaller or shorter focal length. Problem with this solution is that as the focal length decreases the amount of distortion will greatly increase. It's this distortion that can make your faces look wonky.

    Best thing to do is close the lens down, but that will require more light which won't be a problem if shooting outside. Another option would be to change the way you two are posing in front of the camera. Standing side by side or shoulder-to-shoulder to each other with the plane of the sensor parallel with you two would be the best solution. This would result in both of you being within the DOF at the same time. Once you start moving the camera off to an angle, then you're both at two different focusing distances away from the plane of the sensor which then results in a situation where the DOF must be increased to get a larger area in focus.

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  • 6 months ago

    A lens can only focus at one distance at a time - unless both faces are exactly the same distance from the lens, one of them *must* be out of focus. In practice, the ammount of bluriness is usualy so small that you don't notice it, so it looks like most things are in focus. The shortest to the longest distances that look ok is the depth of field, and the reason you're having problems is your depth of field is too shallow. Shooting in bright light, zooming out, and having the camera as far away as possible will all help.

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  • 6 months ago

    It's having trouble deciding which face to focus on. When setting up your scene, suggest to the camera that it should track a unique pattern or color on your friend who is already in the frame. Also, the manual suggests:

    "In certain cases, tracking may not be able to track the subject. Typical examples include: -Subjects extremely small or large in relation to the overall picture.-Subjects too similar to the background.-Subjects lacking sufficient contrast. -Fast-moving subjects. -When shooting indoors with insufficient lighting."

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