Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 6 months ago

Can a landlord legally send an officer to my apartment a few days after I move when they had 60 day notice?

On May I told the property managers that I am breaking my lease early and moving on July 2019 due to my fiancé being pregnant and us needing to leave so we can save money and be financially prepared for the baby since the rent we were paying was really high.We gave them 60 day notice that we are leaving and told them I understand there is a lease break fee, but I won’t be able to pay it right away since the money I had saved is savings for the baby. I told them I will pay it when I can. I also sent out an email to one of the property managers giving them another notice so they don’t forget. On the beginning of July I got a call from one of the property managers, they were being very disrespectful and saying that do not care that my fiancé is pregnant and that she doesn’t care that we are having a baby. They threaten to take me to court and I said okay take me, but I’m going to tell the court the same thing I’m telling them that I cannot pay the lease break fee because I don’t have the money too. Today they sent an officer to the apartment building where I use to live at 8:15PM!!!! I told the property managers many times I’m moving on MONDAY the 15th and they will have the keys back either today or Wednesday the 17th.

Can they legally send an office to the apartment complex late at night even when the lease office is closed, and when they had multiple notices that I was moving?

18 Answers

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  • In
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    What did the police officer say when he came? He certainly wouldn't be there because of your lease dispute and something is missing from this story. If it was to serve eviction papers, the court would have sent a constable or process server, not a police officer.

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  • 6 months ago

    You will have to pay the lease breaking fee before you move out of the property.You would have given issued a 30 day notice for moving so it woold have better if you had settled it.

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  • Eva
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Your priorities are admirable, but legally you do have the money to pay. You can't just say you'll pay when you get around to it and expect them not to file charges.

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  • 6 months ago

    Just because you've said you're moving doesn't mean that you aren't breaking the lease - which includes failing to pay the required break fee. They're a business; your life choices aren't relevant to the legal agreement between you.

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  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    You are right, they don't care about the pregnancy. Why would they? You entered a business transaction with them, the lease, which you are breaking, and that's what they care about. The fact that you "cannot" pay the fee is what's causing the problem. I'd be inclined to pay the fee sooner rather than later and then start saving for the baby. Peace of mind in priceless. The bit about the police, not sure why they were sent, or what the outcome expected was.

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  • 6 months ago

    Your 60-day notice doesn't apply to breaking the lease. They are 100% allowed by law to do what they are doing. You owe the money and guess what? The courts don't care that you want to use the landlord's money for other things.

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  • 6 months ago

    Sure, they can send an officer wherever and whenever they want. Whether or not that officer can do anything or what they sent them for is another story.

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  • 6 months ago

    Yes they can, and telling you that they don't care that your fiance is pregnant is not being disrespectful. It is a simple fact - IRRELEVANT to the lease you signed. You didn't pay the break the lease fee so you "abandoned" the place. Expect to be formally evicted and sued, and you will have less money for the baby, with court costs, penalties, late fees, possibly attorney's fees and interest added to your debt - your obligation throughout the FULL term of your lease. And I'm not being disrespectful either. I'm just telling you the facts - what will happen.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience and with Landlord & Tenant law experience.
    • .6 months agoReport

      The landlord also has an obligation to re rent the apartment ASAP! In this market, that should be easy! He shouldn't owe much.

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  • 6 months ago

    So you are bitching that they sent someone to look at the unit 8PM the day **after** you said you would be out by?

    Let's hope the baby turns out less of an entitled snowflake than you did.

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  • 6 months ago

    I am going to guess that when you gave notice, you also made the mistake to stop paying rent during those 60 days too because you justified in your own mind that if you weren't using the property, you didn't need to pay rent. And as a result your landlord had you evicted. Thus the "officer" that arrived at your door wasn't sent by the property management, but by the eviction court to remove you and your belongings from the property.

    I am just guessing because the information provided in your question was vague. Sorry about your credit, and congrats on the baby.

    • .6 months agoReport

      Seems like a good guess to me.

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