College???

I’m going into high school and I was just wondering what it takes to get into a good college. How many clubs do you need to participate in?? Does being in varsity tennis really boost ur chances?? How many volunteer hours do you need? What do you consider a good GPA??

Anyway thanks to all answers!!

9 Answers

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It depends on the specific university. Many public state institutions just care about your grades and ACT/SAT scores. More selective schools will want to see evidence of school and community involvement, of leadership experiences, and of any unique activities or interests that you've pursued. Being involved in lots of things isn't as impressive as being highly involved in a few things - commitment looks good, and leadership looks better. Playing sports is certainly something that appears favorable.

    A "good" GPA will also vary by school. There are again many public state schools that require only a minimum 2.0. The Ivy League schools generally see applicants with 3.8+ unweighted GPAs. A 3.5 is considered good by most standards. A 3.0 is solid.

    Source(s): University professor
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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    When I graduated high school man I had a 1.7 GPA. I barely got out and still not sure how I did. I ended up going and starting at a small school to prove myself and ultimately graduated only six years after high school with a four year science degree from a top 30 public university. Point being, there are many paths to get into a “good college”. Don’t let anything stop you from getting what you want.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Hi Navya,

    Thanks for your question. The answer is I would forego the whole college thing altogether and just join the Navy instead. Don't forget to click on all those boats in the captcha to verify that you're a real boy just like Pinocchio!

    Thanks.

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  • 6 months ago

    In the U.S., getting into college is based primarily on your GPA and test scores. What GPA and test scores you want to aim for depend on what you consider a "good" college. You can look up the GPAs and test scores or admitted students of websites like BigFuture and Niche or sometimes of the university's own website.

    1. Unweighted GPA

    2. SAT or ACT score

    3. The "rigor" or difficulty of the classes you took.

    4. Whether your GPA and tests scores are consistent with one another.

    5. Your essays

    6. Your letters of recommendation

    7. Your extra curricular activities.

    Your clubs and activities are ways of showing you have interests outside of the classroom. They also demonstrate your ability to manage your time and dedicate yourself to the pursuit of something as well as team work. Being on the tennis team would do that. However, most universities won't even get this far in your application if your GPA and test scores aren't within the range they want.

    Being a sports "star" is only a big help if you are recruited to play varsity tennis at the university. You and your family need to determine if you are good enough and whether that is even an interest to you. Your coach and help you navigate NCAA eligibility and all that if you are interested.

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  • 6 months ago

    As far as admissions decisions, nothing is more important than GPA. You do not need to overdo the clubs, but do SOMETHING other than just study. I did swim, water polo and theatre because I enjoyed them. I got into every school I applied to but one. I have friends who did every club and had no free time that did not do as well.

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  • In
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Unless you are going for a sports scholarship, you are better off taking all of the college prep classes available and try to maintain at least a 3.4 GPA.

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  • juliet
    Lv 5
    6 months ago

    It all depends on what your goals are; what’s your major going to be? Do you want to play tennis in college? How much scholarship money do you physically need to be able to afford school?

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Money is probably the most important factor in the United States. If you're not coming from an affluent background, going to college can easily become a debt trap and you could find yourself buried under decades of crushing debt.

    Club participation isn't as important when it comes to getting into college as you would think and you really want to avoid joining clubs that don't appeal to you, since they're mostly a waste of time. Join clubs that revolve around things you're passionate about, such as the anime club if you like anime or the art club if you like art. Also, be wary of religious clubs; I know they like to do things like throw pizza parties, but they can be really predatory. I would also be skeptical of political clubs and military-oriented clubs for the same exact reason. Again, focus on clubs that appeal to your interests, since they're a good way to meet like-minded people and build lasting friendships that might stay with you well into adulthood. Don't worry about other people's perceptions here.

    As for sports, again, focus only on what you're absolutely interested in pursuing and can commit the time and energy to doing. The same rule applies to activities like band and choir, since these activities will take up a lot of your time and energy, which you might not be able to manage. If you have the time to volunteer and want to do it, do it, but don't beat yourself up over not doing it if you don't do it.

    Focus on passing your classes and getting good grades, but don't let it rule your life and understand that not everything boils down to having a perfect GPA. If you're able to graduate at all, that's a huge win and the doors to college will be opened by virtue of passing alone.

    Don't neglect building friendships and making connections with people.

    That being said, instead of worrying about getting into a big name school, start off by earning your associates degree at your local community college instead. Community colleges are much, much cheaper, are open admissions, and provide additional resources like remedial classes if you need them. Once you've completed an associates degree you can transfer your credits to a bachelors degree program at a larger school, and most likely bypass the standard admission requirements in the process. An associates degree will also give you better job prospects than "some college" if you need to work while studying. CLEP tests are another good way to reduce your tuition costs. It's also okay if you decide to take a break before figuring out what direction you want to go in.

    Don't worry so much.

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  • .
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Only three things matter:

    1. The rigor of your high school coursework

    2. Your unweighted GPA

    3. Your ACT or SAT scores

    People can tell lies about clubs and activities. And universities do not have the resources to verify any of those claims.

    • D36 months agoReport

      Also I might add, if you don’t meet their high school requirements, you can go somewhere else to get your basics done, do well and transfer. Once you acquire so many college credits, most colleges won’t ask for your high school transcripts except after admission to verify graduation.

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