Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 6 months ago

When psychologists speak of an evolved 'belief instinct', could they be correct?

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  • 6 months ago
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    Not correct.. Atheists must have lost this inherited gene.

    Atheists and humanists are rapidly growing entities.

    Free thinking, untainted by religious nonsense, is enhanced by today's technology.

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  • 6 months ago

    Seems YA still doesn’t allow annons to attach an active link. Copypaste the link into browser ....amazon? wtf.

    Sounds like Richard Dawkins coinage of the religious meme. That is, a belief instinct can be inherited like a gene. Would a belief system shared among a group, like a shamanistic animism, provide an evolutionary advantage? It would seem so.

    While still being studied, gene-culture coevolution, also known as dual inheritance, strongly suggests that a belief instinct evolved. Genes play a part, and the cultural meme plays a part, evolving side by side, imbuing the tribe with evolutionary advantage of group cohesiveness.

    My concern is with people who say god made it so.... god is the cause/director of evolution. Because the gene/meme is formalized and interpreted through religious practices they are literally UNABLE to self diagnose it.

    ....Meaning the meme preserves itself and is culturally inherited often at the cost of the group’s general knowledge and power. Evolutionarily speaking, we are stuck with it. If it turns out that today in the anthropocene it is less of an advantage than it was 250,000 years ago, we may see the meme gradually retreat.

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  • 6 months ago

    Religious belief is a cultural and traditional thingy. We are all born atheists but our loving traditional parents and extended family changed that.

    Religious faith is not biologically inherited as the author presents.

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