bob m asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 7 months ago

where did curry originate?

7 Answers

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  • 7 months ago

    Just visit the kitchen of an Indian cook, and the eye will catch dozens of seasonings in varied colors and shapes. Among them are tiny black mustard seeds; sticks of fragrant, brown cinnamon; green pods of cardamom; brilliant, golden turmeric; pale, gnarled gingerroot; and scarlet-red chilies. Contrast this assortment with a single bottle of curry powder found in grocery stores in many countries. Curry powder does, of course, contain a mixture of various spices.

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  • 7 months ago

    Seriously? A 2 second google search?

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    Curry dishes prepared in the southern states of India, where the word also originated, may be spiced with leaves from the curry tree. There are many varieties of dishes called 'curries'. ... Curry powder, a commercially prepared mixture of spices, is largely a Western creation, dating to the 18th century.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    India. Kari simply means sauce. Popularized in the 18th century by Hannah Glasse but spices as a way of preserving meat had been available via the East India Company since Tudor times.

    The kind of thing you get in the UK are created by Pakistani restaurants to meet the need for their customers who demand super hot food after overdoing the lager and is nothing like Indians actually consume.

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  • 7 months ago

    The English medieval cookbook, The Forme of Cury, 1390

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    7 months ago

    It was an anglo indian invention, and dates back possibly 300 years. Most UK curries resemble the meals cooked by Bangladeshi crewmen on merchant ships.

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  • 7 months ago

    In the toilet bowl

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    India .

    • John P
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Indeed in the Indian sub-continent. The word means "stew" in one of the Indian languages.

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