wolfdreamer asked in PetsDogs · 7 months ago

Can a dog with upright ears damage the cartilage in them?

I came home from work yesterday to find my yearling German Shepherd with one ear flopped loosely over. I immediately checked the ear for scratches since I have 2 cats, but couldn t find anything. The puppy can hold his ear up to listen, but it still folds over sometimes. Did he break his ear?

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  • 7 months ago

    I think this is normal

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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Yes its possible. The ear probably will never stand up again at this point in time.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    I rescued a GSD that had been kenneled (in a very small kennel) for several months. Both of her ears were damaged, and neither EVER stood up.

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  • 7 months ago

    It may eventually stand & if it doesn't it would be a genetic fault because of poor genetics from poor breeding tactics of a stupid ignorant BYBer. If it doesn't eventually stand the cartilage is just too weak to stand. There are lots of problems with GSDs that are bred by BYBers. These poor quality dogs don't stand a chance with ignorant breeders. Your dog will have joint problems & will develop hip dysplasia. All Backyard Bred GSD get it. Reputable breeders have bred that out of their GSDs but the BYBers don't do anything to insure you have a healthy dog.

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    • King Les The Lofty
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      themselves produced at least one offspring with a hip score worse than 20 out of the 106 that is the worst possible in the BVA-BIF scoring system we use. Ideally, GSDs should have a hip score total of 0 to 10 when both hips' scores are added together.

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  • 7 months ago

    ● "Can a dog with upright ears damage the cartilage in them?"

    Almost ALL things are possible - but no dog is likely to do that to ITSELF. One of my roles is to tattoo dogs' for identification - especially before microchips became compulsory. It involves fitting 6 blocks, each with about 12 needles in it, each forming a letter or a digit, into special tattooing pliars. Disinfect the ear, then squeeze the pliars so the needles go right through the ear and into the hard rubber of the other jaw of the pliars. We release the pliars then rub tattooing ink into the holes. I've never yet had an ear that didn't become fully erect - usually BEFORE the other ear erected.

    ● "I came home from work yesterday to find my yearling German Shepherd with one ear flopped loosely over. I immediately checked the ear for scratches since I have 2 cats, but couldn t find anything."

    I doubt that any domestic cat could break the cartilage in a yearling German Shepherd Dog's ear.

    Consider checking deeper in the ear's canal for an infection.

    Do you know his pedigree and whether any of his 2 parents, 4 grandparents, 8 greatgrandparents, 16 greatgreatgrandoarents had a floppy ear?

    ● "The puppy"

    You don't have a PUPPY - puppyhood ends the minute a pooch is 1 year old.

    You correctly called him a yearling. An alternative term until he is 2 years old is JUNIOR.

    ● "can hold his ear up to listen, but it still folds over sometimes. Did he break his ear?"

    If he can still control his ear, the problem is not yet serious - but might BECOME so.

    Check his general health & interest in life in case he is ill. And DEFINITELY check that ear's canal as far as you can WITHOUT poking inside it.

    Now - why haven't you been choosing a Best Answer to each of your questions? As well as rewarding one of the people who spent their time TRYING to help you, you yourself regain 3 of the 5 points it "costs" to ask a question.

    Some of your questions are so old that it is likely that Yahoo has "locked" them so that you can no longer choose their Best Answer. But the only way to find out is to TRY.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    😛 To discuss GSDs, join some groups such as

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/GSD_Friendly/i...

    by sending an e-mail about yourself to the Subscribe address on that page.

    The people in them KNOW about GSDs. Plus you can include several actual photos in your posts.

    To find other groups or breeds, type the breed-name into the top field of

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/dir

    then choose a couple of groups to Join - use the group's

    Message History

    on its /info page to make sure that it still has members who are ACTIVE.

    😛 Also join

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/The_GSD_Source...

    so that you can easily look up all sorts of information about dogs, especially GSDs. It is an "encyclopaedia" group (to which members can ask for new sources to be added), not a discussion group.

    King Les The Lofty - first pup in 1950; GSD breeder & trainer as of 1968

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Typically when pups ears change like this they are likely teething of course with a GSD with pricked ears it is more noticable than with other breeds...... my BC pups ears changed daily when she was teething, on up, one down then it swapped the next day

    Of course if it is not a pup and not puppy teething,then check its mouth in case of any bad/damaged teeth/sore gums and also check the ear to see if there is not a cut/scratch/red/sore which could be a potential haematoma or even mites...both of those will need a vet check up and treatment

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  • 7 months ago

    Yes, that can happen. The only way to know if there's cartilage damage would be to take the dog to the Vet for an examination..

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  • PR
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I would contact the vet, or the breeder. That way you will have a better answer.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Don't worry. It's normal.

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