I don’t know anything about m1 carbines rifles as investment are the Inland versions good?

6 Answers

Relevance
  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    AS unidriver says. Pretty much absolutely correct. Universal is another VERY numerous maker. INLAND made more M1s then anyone else. Irwin-Pedersen made the fewest so those are the most RARE.

    If NOT buying from an FFL, I highly suggest you know what you are looking at. I have twice found an M2 NOT the M1 being sold. One private owner the other at a flea market table. Those being Full Auto Capable are ILLEGAL firearm to own or possess UNLESS you have the Federal Tax Stamp.

    You may find even some police depts. had the M2 which may be floating around and maybe one day for sale. A very close friend whos Dad was a local small town police cheif offered me a Reising M50. MANY small town police depts. had a full auto weapon or two left over from prohibition days.HECK I remember Western Auto selling Thompsons for $425, extra magazines in wrappers, by the case. NO PAPERWORK needed back then. You now what ... no one wanted them. You could not hunt with them. They were hungry, far to hungry just for playing in the back yard.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Staap It
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      OH, Herbert McBride if you ever watched the History channel was an authority they used often on Tales of the Gun. The big chubby guy with the white linen gloves : )

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    Very few guns are a worth while investment. Very, very few.

    Full auto machine guns, legal in 39 states, are the best guns to invest in. According to Forbes machine guns are the best investment possible since they have consistently out paced gold, silver, and all stocks. Part of the reason they increase in value is the 1982 Gun Control Act that closed the machine gun registry to new models and addition guns. The pool of guns in that registry are the only once legal to transfer from private citizen to another. A Mac-10 machine pistol cost $375 plus the $200 tax stamp in 1981. Today a 35+ year old used one sells for $4200 plus $200 tax stamp. In 1981 a stripped Colt M16 receiver was $67, today the same thing new in the box is over $18,000. The used M16 costing $400 in 1981 sells for over $9500 even with all the scratches and wear.

    Most commonly sold guns - you will be long dead and your grandkids at retirement age before they appreciate in value enough to notice.

    Some common pistol are good investments and do increase in value: Walther PPK,PPK/s etc will increase $40 a year..... so will top end Kimbers and Colt 1911's. I bought a new Colt Gold Cup 1911 for $500 in 1989, fired it for decades on several pistol teams - I put thousands of rounds through it - then sold it in 2010 for $900. Very few guns will do that.

    Want to know what to invest in? Go visit a couple of guns shows - what ever you see on the tables will be guns and models you want to avoid!! LOL. You wont see any Walthers or Kimbers and damn few top Colts.

    You also need to do research. Example: Smith and Wesson was making the Walther PPK/s for them in Maine. At the beginning of 2009 they ceased production to handle a recall. This made the PPK hard to find. Come Sept of 2009 Smith and Wesson was notified by Walther lawyers the contract required them to produce at least 60 of the PPK/s a year. Of course S&W freaked - with the production line closed for nine months - they had to do something. Solution was to assemble a bunch of master pistol smiths and hand make 60 pistols. 30 were sent to East Coast top distributors and 30 to west coast top distributors. There were called 'allocation pistols'. I happen to have one, in 2009 I wanted one for my wife to replace one she had sold a decade before. Last time I saw one of these it was languishing on gunbroker for $500 until someone noticed it was one of those allocation pistols - then it went over $1500. Finding one of those and paying for it like it was a regular PPK/s would be sweet. If you plan to invest in guns, but, do not want to have machine guns - you need to learn about things like the PPK's story. That means staying 'plugged in' with all the local dealers and clubs.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 6 months ago

    The only M1 Carbines that will not only retain their value but may go up are the WWII era models. Out of that era the ones made by Rock-ola, Union Switch & Signal, IBM, & Underwood are preferred, one of the most sought after is from the combined efforts of Underwood and Quality Hardware which literally bares the name UN-QUALITY. If you find one of those prepare to pay a hefty price if the seller knows what he has. Firearms can be a good investment, not all of them will be. Common mass produced modern firearms rarely if ever go up in price.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Gold or stocks are a better investment.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 6 months ago

    The Inland versions are the most numerous, the others like Rockola, Winchester, IBM are better bets,

    Try a search and you can find sites dedicated to carbines and see production numbers for each maker.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Kieth
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Guns are a poor investment, every collector has theirs, and they aren't going to pay market price for a used one if they want another. Invest in gold, it's always going up.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.