Anonymous

Is it hard to get permanent disability with a rare disorder since the doctors evaluating for disability have never heard of it?

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  • Ann
    Lv 7
    7 months ago
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    What you do is gather as much information about the condition as you can and take it with you to the evaluation. Ask the examiner to read about the condition and see how much your symptoms compare with those given for the condition. It's what the condition does to your body or mind that will determine whether you would be approved for disability. I have a condition that, while it is not extremely rare, has been often misdiagnosed (mine was incorrectly diagnosed for decades). I have Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, which is in the family with Multiple Sclerosis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Lupus. It causes tearing and breaking of tendons and ligaments. Drs. kept trying to say I had Lupus for years. An occupational therapist was the person who finally figured out what I have. If you have something that is obscure, find out everything you can about the condition, print it out, and take it to the person evaluating you. Tell him how it affects your daily living every day. That is the key to getting disability benefits.

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  • 7 months ago

    The diagnosis is not the most iportant bit, it is how it affects you. If a doctor can document that- that is what is critical.

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  • Judith
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    In the US a person must have a medically determinable mental or physical condition which is so severely disabling that they are incapable of working and earning at least $1220 a month for at least one full year. Social Security obtains the medical records and evaluates them. After evaluating them SS makes a decision as to disability.

    Just because a person has a diagnosis doesn't mean they will be approved - it depends upon the severity of the condition; symptoms can easily be documented.

    Anyone who has a condition which has been diagnosed would be referred to a specialist who knows how to treat that condition.

    Source(s): I was a SS claims rep for 32 yrs.
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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    In the U.K. it almost certainly will be difficult and, for that reason, you need to ask that a doctor with some knowledge of the illness is the one to interview you. Whoever it was that gave you the diagnosis needs to be contacted and asked to give details of the illness and the prognosis regarding chance of recovery or treatment required and how the disorder affects your everyday life.

    I feel that doctors are being recruited who know very little about the patients that they are assessing. In my opinion this is a deliberate act so that very few will succeed in their claim for money to help their disability. It is a very cruel system being used at the moment and designed purely to be able to turn down claims.

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  • 7 months ago

    Doctors would often know how to treat the patient with therapy/medication after the diagnosis.

    There is often multiple mental health diagnoses for each patient.

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