Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationRail · 5 months ago

Are there engineers and conductors in the adjoining freight trains of the main train?

6 Answers

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  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    I think what you are talking about is the engines in the middle of the long, heavy train. Those are Distributed Power units. These engines are there to ease the strain on the couplers and the engineer in the lead engine controls them remotely. On undulating section of the track an engineer can manipulate the power output of the engines in the middle and the rear of the train to minimize the coupler run in and run out. Also, on the long train when the engineer apples the brakes from at the head end it can take up to several seconds for the brake line pressure change to reach the end of the train. With Distributed Power the brakes are applied more uniformly throughout the train.

  • Dale-E
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    I have never thought of it in the way you are saying it. I suspect you do not know, what technically is called a train. Every train movement requires a crew. But in the case of remote control, they might not be in it, but only next to it and sometimes within a quarter mile of it. Back in the early 60's we had a train we regularly ran from Roseville California into Oakland, across the bay from San Francisco. It had a caboose in the midst of the train, but that cab did not mark the end of the train. The cab at the end of the train was lit with markers that indicated, "End of Train". There was one crew for all of it. In Oakland, all that was behind that middle caboose stayed in Oakland. The middle cab became the new EOT marker. A new crew then took that train around the bay and back to San Francisco.

  • Martin
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Yes there are engineers and conductors there.

  • 5 months ago

    If you mean a long string of freight with more than one set of engines in the length of it, yes. At least that was true in the past. There are now technologies that let just one crew control more than one set of engines.

    • Dale-E
      Lv 7
      4 months agoReport

      I have given this an up vote because, helper engines were applied at the rear end of some freight trains to help them over hills in the middle of normally fairly flat routs. Helper crews were nothing more than its engineer and fireman.

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  • Kenny
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    "in the adjoining freight trains" There are no adjoining trains of any kind . I think you need to rephrase the question .

    Source(s): 34 years railroading .
  • Mark
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    ??? This makes no sense.

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