Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingParenting · 7 months ago

How would you get your teenage daughter to help with household chores?

29 Answers

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  • 6 months ago

    offer her money then never pay her.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You should have started teaching your daughter how to do household chores when she was a toddler. Had you done so, she'd be able to do them now without being told. YOU created this situation through your own LAZINESS, so you are stuck with it.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Tell her she's family and you're all family and need to work together to make things nice for all of you. Use guilt about all the stuff you have to do in life to make the house nice for her. Let her know that if she ever leaves home her flatmates will expect her to do a lot of tasks so she should get in the habit now. Above all use "I statements" like "I feel unloved when I don't get help with the house) instead of you statements that might get her back up. Tell her you love her and you want to all work together to make the house nice and you want her to be prepared for her future when she will have to do more than she is now.

    This has somewhat worked with my son. His father and I never asked him to do anything when he was a kid either and then his father died and I needed more help. He's really lazy about the laundry though and takes forever to put it away but he's good about a few other things.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    take her phone away. Duh.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Take away her phone and put it in a safe with a code and don’t tell her the code.

    Make it fun for her — get a speaker or stereo and let her listen to music while she cleans or does whatever chores. You could also give her a reward as motivation, like for example: “If you clean the whole house I will take you shopping and buy you a new outfit.” — not the best example, but something along those lines.

    Good luck 🙂

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  • 7 months ago

    If she's refusing to help, take away her cell phone.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Tell her she's old enough now to help with chores and that housework is part of life and she needs to contribute her fair share. Then tell her what you want done.

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  • 7 months ago

    You would have started getting your much younger child engaged in helping with household chores so that by her teenage years she'd be doing them automatically.

    If you haven't started her on doing chores till now, point out to her that you need a hand with doing these ordinary things and that, to live comfortably, healthily, and well, ordinary household chores have to be done on a daily basis.

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  • Lita
    Lv 6
    7 months ago

    She would have been taught from an early age that she has responsibilities as part of the family and a member of the household and would understand that she will do chores and help around the house.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    I would start her very early. The moment my kids could crawl and make a mess they were helping clean up. I'd take their hand in mine and help them put toys back in a basket and tell them thank you for helping clean up. As soon as they could sit up they'd sit next to me and "help" me fold laundry. I'd give them a hand towel and let them play with it while I folding clothes. My kids grew up not seeing chores as chores but part of being part of a family. It's really sad your daughter is a teenager and doesn't help out. What in the world has she been doing all this time? Many parents blame the child, but it's the parent's fault. You have to start early. A parents goal is to raise a child into a functioning adult. It isn't something you start when they are teens.

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