Sammy
Lv 5
Sammy asked in HealthOther - Health · 1 year ago

What's it called when your bone snaps cleanly into 2 separate pieces?

11 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

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  • Edna
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Any time a bone breaks, it's a fracture.

    A bone that breaks completely into two or more pieces is called a compound fracture. They usually require surgery and pins to rejoin the ends of the bone.

    A bone that breaks only on the surface of the bone (the ends of the bone aren't displaced) is often called a simple fracture. The break usually heals itself without any surgical intervention - often with only a cast or some sort of immobilizing appliance for a few weeks.

    Someone who breaks a bone in his foot very often has only a "simple" fracture. He only needs to wear a "boot" on his foot during his waking hours, in order to keep his full weight off the break while it's healing.

  • 1 year ago

    If it’s a single break, it’s simply a fracture, from there it can be spiral, open, closed etc. if there are 2 breaks so that there are 3 pieces, that is a compound fracture, if not clear, search up some pictures

  • 1 year ago

    It sounds like a broken bone.

    Nonetheless, id go to ER immediately.

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  • 1 year ago

    My orthopedist called it a fracture when I snapped my kneecap in half.

  • 1 year ago

    A painful catastrophe! But this is known as a clean break. If the bone does not penetrate the skin, it is a closed fracture. If it protrudes through the skin it's an open fracture. If it only partially snaps as in young children, it is a greenstick fracture. Hope that helps.

  • 1 year ago

    Double compound fracture. What does this have to do with Dogs?

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    It's called a fracture.

  • 1 year ago

    A "green" break..... Green stick fracture.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    compound fracture

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