Underrated US state to visit?

I'm planning to go to the US and want to go to a state that's not that widely known. Recommendations? (ie. Not states like Hawaii or California)

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Colorado is nice but is also getting pretty touristy. If you're into wide open spaces you might try Montana or Utah.

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  • 7 months ago

    Delaware, they have really nice beaches and nature areas

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  • 7 months ago

    You are wise to avoid the usual tourist traps. I don't know how much time you have to travel or your budget (the US is vast in terms of distance, so be prepared for that), but here is a random list that I believe might give you a real feel for the USA: East Coast: check out Virginia, even the Washington, DC area (one exception to the no tourist trap rule), North Carolina, Georgia. Interior: Michigan-try to avoid Detroit-rest of the state is vastly underrated; Illinois including Chicago, but it has its problems; South Dakota; Colorado (not the ski slopes); Texas, especially the area near Austin and San Antonio--I always like San Marcos as base from which to explore the rugged and beautiful Texas Hill Country; New Mexico, especially Santa Fe (not the tourist trap it used to be), Eagle Nest NM; Montana, especially Missoula (the state is very underrated probably because only about 1 million live in the whole state); Heading farther West: Idaho- both Boise and north to Coeur D'Alene over into nearby Spokane, Washington (beautiful area), northwestern Washington in and around the San Juan Islands. Those are just a few. You will likely get a better look at Americana than at the usual tourist spots only interested in what money you spend.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The list of states that are the most well-known to foreigners and receive the most visitors would probably be: (In alphabetical order)

    California

    Florida

    Hawaii

    Nevada

    New York

    Those would be the big five. California is the most populous US state, it's where you can find Los Angeles and Hollywood, San Francisco, Yosemite and many other places, so it sees a lot of visitors. Florida is home to Disney World, a host of other theme parks and plenty of beaches, so it's also very popular. Hawaii has a great climate, spectacular scenery and it's the closest part of the US for people traveling from places like Korea and Japan and Australia, so it's popular. Nevada has Las Vegas, which is obviously the biggest draw by far, but it's also got Reno and Lake Tahoe, so although it doesn't seem as though it's got a whole lot going for it, it's definitely one of the most visited US states. Then of course there's New York, where you can find New York City, a place that gets heaps of tourists from all over the world.

    Considering that you're asking for an "underrated" state, I'm not going to list states that are only known for one particular thing or one particular area. Examples would include:

    Alaska - everybody knows that it's stunningly beautiful and a very unique part of the country.

    Texas - everything is bigger in Texas, lots of history and character, but definitely not off the beaten trek by any means.

    Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming - plenty of nature, the national parks receive a lot of visitors, but not exactly hidden gems either.

    A similar argument could be made for Colorado, Utah and of course Arizona, because millions upon millions of people go there every year to see the Grand Canyon.

    Here are my top picks:

    North Carolina. It's a state that's got an incredible amount of variety to it. It's got world-class beaches, the mountain scenery is just breathtaking. Standing atop a grassy bald in the Great Smoky Mountains is an incredible experience. There's surfing, skiing, hiking, there's a lot of history, and there are some really interesting places. Asheville is very trendy and artsy. If you could combine your visit to North Carolina with a side trip to South Carolina you could see Charleston as well, which is a really cool city and you could tuck into some shrimp and grits and stroll around. The Carolinas are actually a great part of the country.

    My next pick would be Michigan. A lot of people, even Americans themselves, don't know that Michigan has the one of the longest coastlines of any US state. Detroit isn't a great city, but it certainly used to be. There's a lot of history there. And Michigan has a lot of great outdoorsy stuff to do - boating, camping, fishing, hiking, that sort of thing. You could tour Detroit - it's nowhere near as bad as it used to be today, see a lot of museums reflecting the states industrial past, lots of lakeside mansions and other cool stuff, head up to Mackinac Island or all the way up to the Upper Peninsula where it's just pristine. The people are cool, it's got its own little vibe. And you can easily cross into Canada for day tripping there as well from places like Detroit or Sault Ste. Marie. Definitely worth a visit.

    New Mexico. It's a huge state, and there's a lot to see and do. Eat great Mexican food, head to Clovis and see the prehistoric sites, check out the museums celebrating the area's contributions to rock and roll music. Sante Fe and Taos have great art scenes. The scenery in New Mexico is great, the mountains, the desert, it's got a lot to offer but most people just see it as a blank space between Texas and the West Coast. Many go straight through it on their way to the Grand Canyon in Arizona and don't stop to take advantage of what's there. There's Carlsbad Caverns, the nuclear testing sites, Roswell, hot springs, white water rafting, old Spanish missions, heaps of Native American attractions. Well worth a visit.

    There are a few other areas I'd recommend, but they're fairly concentrated in only one part of the state so I'm not listing the states where they can be found because there's not much else:

    The Massachusetts seacoast - Cape Cod, New Bedford whaling museum, Boston, etc.

    The Ohio Valley - parts of Kentucky, West Virginia and Ohio, but other than beautiful scenery and nature, not much else.

    New Orleans. A very unique part of the USA. But the rest of Louisiana isn't that great.

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  • 7 months ago
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  • 7 months ago

    Not widely known? Those of us who live here know all the states It would help if you could tell us what you're interest in seeing/doing. There are incredible desert vistas in Arizona and New Mexico, lakes and outdoor living in Minnesota and Michigan, gorgeous views from the Blue Ridge Parkway in the Appalachians, etc.

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  • 7 months ago

    Of course it depends on what you're looking for.

    Oregon is very nice. The strip along the ocean has lots of beaches and resorts (too cold to swim though). Then behind the first row of mountains is the I5 corridor with several very nice small cities like Eugene, Salem, Medford, etc. And Portland, one of everyone's favorite big cities. (It's not that big.) Washington is similar but much wetter (though Seattle is interesting, and all the islands in the NW corner.)

    Idaho is nice too (right next to Oregon) Boise is a really interesting city, plus up north in the 'panhandle' it's very isolated and woodsy.

    After that is the Rocky Mountains, mostly the western halves of Montana and Colorado. Beautiful mountain scenery (and be sure to include Yellowstone in the NW corner of Wyoming, and Glacier Nat'l Park at the northern edge of Montana.)

    As you can probably tell I travel mostly around the West. 8^)

    Most of the middle of the country, from Denver until at least the Mississippi, is dullsville. Not that you wouldn't discover interesting things in Oklahoma, Kansas, Iowa, etc. but the land itself is flat and not that interesting. And the towns all look economically depressed.

    Kentucky is very pretty. Rolling hills. BEAUTIFUL horses. Clean, cute little towns. Very friendly people, though if you only speak normal English you might need an interpreter. In fact that whole area--Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee--is interesting, almost like a whole different country inside our country.

    Then I would say New England in general. Vermont, New Hampshire, 'Upstate' New York, especially in the fall with the leaves turning. Very picturesque.

    And there's a reason California is so well-known as a tourist destination.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    It depends upon what you're looking for. If you want nature, there's Maine, Alaska, Montana, or Utah. If you're into culture and history, you might try Pennsylvania or Massachusetts.

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  • 7 months ago

    I think Alaska :)

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Go fishing for Lingcod and Sea Bass on a charter boat out of LaPush WA.

    • I got yellowfin on a boat out of Point Pleasant, NJ. The bass aren't running now.

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