Can I really be charged fines or criminal penalties for after losing my job for not carding ATF agents?

Last December I got fired at the convenience store I worked at for not carding someone who looked old enough to buy cigarettes and was in fact an undercover ATF agent. I never expected to get charged criminally but last week I got a letter in the mail that was a subpoena which said I must appear in court and assess the charges being filed against me, which could include a fine of up to $2500. Why didn't the charges get filed sooner? And shouldn't this not even be happening since it was so long ago?

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    The only reason you'd be charged with a crime should be that the prosecutor's office has evidence that you may have colluded with the under-aged buyers by accepting bribes from them. Just selling cigarettes to an under-aged buyer who may have looked older is just an innocent mistake. Therefore, you have to talk to the district attorney's office and ask why on Earth they are charging you with a crime for something you may have done by mistake, but not intentionally. See if a free, public defender attorney can help you with this also.

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  • 1 year ago

    The fact that you didn't expect to be charged doesn't mean that you wouldn't be. It often takes several months for charges to be filed. Get a lawyer.

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  • 1 year ago

    Yes, you sure can. There is a statute of limitations on any crime, this is how much time they have to charge you. It is usually 2 years minimum.

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Yes, you violated your state law and yes you can be fined for it.

    You knew the law, you knew the policy of your store, you decided NOT to follow those procedures, so yes, you can be fined for it.

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  • 1 year ago

    If that person was under 21, it is a crime to sell liquor whether you check k the ID or not.

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    You sure can, ESPECIALLY if you (and you most likely did) signed an agreement to "card" everyone.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    you go to the police station to get charges , not the court . I think they are calling you as a witness against your boss to say he didn't tell you to check the ID of every person .

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    They use an underage person to so these stings and he has to appear in court as a witness. So they don't want to give it away to the other stores in the area that they are running a sting operation until they have tested all the stores.

    They can wait until the statute of limitations which for this offence is about 6 years.

    You can be charged that's why these shop owners don't do that job themselves. If they get caught they lose their licence to sell alcohol, if a member of staff gets caught they just have to replace them!

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    You should fight it since you are not legally required by the ATF to do 100% ID checks for tobacco.

    πŸ˜‚ 😘 πŸ‘Œ Lolz

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  • 1 year ago

    "Why didn't the charges get filed sooner?" Because while these cases are important, they are not the highest priority they are dealing with.

    "And shouldn't this not even be happening since it was so long ago?" 7 months ago is not "so long ago". Certainly it is well with in the statutes of limitations.

    You need a lawyer. If you can not afford one, request a public defender the first time you are in court.

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