Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsHorses · 7 months ago

Horse hurt left front foot. After a moth of rest now his right front is crippled. Nobody knows what’s wrong after clean x rays.?

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  • John
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Smart horse. You have to learn. Animals are not dumb. You, apparently, aren't the one that horse likes but I'll bet you got in first with loads of cash.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Hope your horse is ok! I know someone who’s pony went lame and didn’t know what was wrong, they had an MRI and found out the answer. maybe worth a try, obviously you have to take into consideration the price !

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  • 6 months ago

    Have a different vet out. Second opinions are worth it.

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  • 7 months ago

    Surely your Vets have told you what they intend to do next to investigate the problem. If not, I would consult a farrier because they often know more about the feet than Vets in my experience.

    I had a two year old filly who went lame. Sable rest, blood tests and what not. Weeks my filly was in a stable lame. The Vets couldn't understand what was wrong. Farrier came looked at her hoof and discovered an abscess the vets had missed.

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  • Eva
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    If he was non-weight bearing on the left front, the right front has had to do extra work for a month. In addition to the excellent suggestion to test for tick-borne illnesses, a visit from your farrier may also be in order to look for white line disease or any other abnormalities in the feet.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Lauren, I would have your vet pull some blood to check this horse for Lyme disease, among other problems. I say this because one of the major clinical signs of Lyme in horses is intermittent lameness which cannot otherwise be explained medically. The horse will be lame in one leg on one day, and then the next day he'll be lame somewhere else for no obvious reason. And Lyme isn't the only tick borne disease which can manifest itself this way.

    I know you've ruled out the obvious bone changes associated with laminitis by X rays, but have you also considered the possibility of a bone infection, or something related to it? Could the horse also be experiencing some sort of allergic reaction to something in his environment? That's another possibility which might be worth looking into.

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