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What causes mass to curve space?

Are there any hypothetical particle causes....which we are looking into, perhaps to manipulate and manage to create warp-drive?

13 Answers

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  • Nyx
    Lv 7
    9 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Gravity, and lots of it.

    Anything with mass, generates gravity. Which in turn bends spacetime.

    https://www.science.org.au/curious/space-time/grav...

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    • Tom
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      The smallest particle of mass IS a "bend" or "Dimple" in space time ----the more mass in one place, the greater the bend.

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  • 9 months ago

    I think it's incorrect to say that gravity causes mass to bend space. From what little I know about relativity, distortion of space IS gravity, not the result of gravity.

    Frank

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    The smallest particle of MASS ultimately is really a DIMPLE in a multidimensional space time, the "substrate" of the universe, and likely the only thing that exists in an absolute form. Everything else is just bends and waves in it.--------the more MASS in one place, the more "Dimples" and the greater the BENDING

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  • 9 months ago

    Physics concave or convex the same way a goldfish sees above the pond.

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  • John
    Lv 4
    9 months ago

    Size and density. Apparently according to theory the smaller mass gets and the denser it is causes space to curve.

    I would think size wouldn't matter it would all be density but that's not what astronaumers are claiming.

    Space in itself is molecular and so those space molecules curve around compact densities.

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  • 9 months ago

    Lots of mass will do it.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    According to Oldand Dilis's theory (doubleslitsolution.weebly.com) mass is the pulling together of quantum particles which causes a pull on the spacetime fabric similar to a pull on an elastic. As it is around a circular core the pull itself becomes circular.

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  • 9 months ago

    Physical Force

    Quite simple really

    It is called Gravity

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    First off, all forms of energy produce gravity, not just the energy content of matter.

    The Alcubierre metric was an attempt to show how a certain spacetime geometry could be used as a type of ‘warp bubble’ to transport a ship. This was a valid geometric solution of general relativity. The basic idea is a certain distribution of matter/energy would generate a region of spacetime where space was expanded in the back of the ‘bubble’, contracted in the front of the bubble, and the ship would remain stationary with respect to the bubble. The bubble itself would move through space at faster than light.

    Unfortunately, this was a brilliant idea, but it was found that the matter/energy required for the bubble had to be negative. This is not known to exist.

    As for why mass/energy curves space, this is not clear. In fact, gravity can be represented independently of curvature. It’s quite a deep subject called active general covariance where gravity and the rest of physics is independent of any background spacetime. General covariance delayed Einstein’s field equation a couple of years as he struggled with the implications of general covariance.

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  • Jeff T
    Lv 6
    9 months ago

    Warp drive is a fiction that assumes relativity is not true. If it's 20 light years from point a to point b, and you're going at .999c, (99.9% of the speed of light) you'll reach the destination in under 1 year.

    • GI_Jane9 months agoReport

      One year for me, you mean.

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