Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsBiology · 5 months ago

If humans have 46 chromosomes, then why are Haplogroups only based on Y-chromosome? What about the other 45?

As far as i understand, Haplogroups trace our ancestry by our y-chromosome and mitDNA. But what about the other 45 chromosomes?

Also, since we humans share 99.4 percent identical genes, does that mean, the y-chromosome differences are the other 0.6 percent of our DNA?

Also, why are there so many different kinds of haplogroups? Do they all make up the remaining 0.6 percent of our DNA?

Why aren't there various types of mitDNA like there are for y-chromosomes?

3 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_mitochondrial_...

    Perhaps you should double-check the basic facts about your subject before asking questions about it.

  • Cowboy
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Haplogroups are based on shared genes passed down by one parent or the other. Major portions of the Y-chromosome are passed on by the male parent to male progeny. Most other nuclear DNA recombines and shows too much variation to be open to analysis.

    Mutations on the Y chromosome define the various groups.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Scientists look at haplogroups because they are easier to trace. Boys and men have their Y-chromosome from their father, everybody has mitochondrial DNA from their mother. The other chromosomes could have taken any path, as both males and females pass them on.

    Also, since we humans share 99.4 percent identical genes, does that mean, the y-chromosome differences are the other 0.6 percent of our DNA?

    No, mutations happen on ANY chromosome, and the Y-chromosome is smaller than the others, so there's less room for variation than on chromosomes with a lower number.

    Why aren't there various types of mitDNA like there are for y-chromosomes?

    there's some variation, but there's even less DNA in a mitochondrium than in a Y-chromosome, so even less room for variation

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