Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsEngineering · 7 months ago

Why aren't we building bridges and underground tunnels across the oceans?

Let's get on it, engineers!

11 Answers

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  • 7 months ago

    I would like to meet the contractors that are going to dewater the Atlantic & Pacific Oceans.

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  • 7 months ago

    There is already a prediluvian tunnel network across whole planet sometimes called Agarthan tunnel network. It was built by us in previous incarnations in Atlantis.

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Who is gonna pay for it?

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  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Study the connectivity of islands in Japan. They built bridges across sea and also longest tunnel under the sea.

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  • Adam D
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    There is no financial or functional benefit to doing so. Roads (along with bridges and tunnels) are needed for routes that are regularly traveled. This comes with financial benefit - goods being transported, people going to/from work or to/from places to spend the money earned at work, etc.

    Ground transport by truck isn't as efficient as barge transportation for long distances. Even trains can't compete with barges. Very, very few people are regularly commuting across an ocean for work, and airplanes are a thing that exists. And while tourism is a big industry, people don't want to spend the bulk of a vacation sitting in the car.

    Planning to drive from NY to London? That's 3,500 miles - more than 40 hours of driving. Where are you going to fill up 8 times in the middle of the Atlantic? Buy food? Sleep?

    How do you propose to finance such a project? A complex bridge often has construction costs in the neighborhood of $500 per square foot of roadway. A bridge crossing a major ocean could be double that. Say we've got 4 lanes (standard, 12' wide), plus a 12' shoulder on each side (for breakdowns), and throw in another 3' for a median barrier for safety, giving a total width of 75'. That's 396,000 square feet of roadway per mile. Over 3,500 miles, at a cost of $1,000 per square foot, that's $1.4 trillion.

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  • 7 months ago

    Engineers do not just go out and build stuff. Big business designs the project and finances it then hires engineers to design the pieces and parts to make it.

    Assume we did build a bridge to go from Calif. to Hawaii. That is 4000 mi.

    Where are you going to get gas, eat, sleep? An aircraft flying there carries ~20,000 gallons of gas to do it. Does your car have a 20,000 gal gas tank? That is five double tanker trucks. Do you have $60,000.00 for gas?

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  • 7 months ago

    BECAUSE TOO EXPENSIVE TO BUILD AND NON STOP HIGH MAINTENANCE COST.

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    cant fault him for trying and i wonder what mess would be if 1500 miles from the nearest land some terrorist decides to use a bomb

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  • Never heard of fault lines, eh? They can't even keep the sidewalks in Iceland from being pulled apart by continental drift, but you want to build a tunnel across the oceans?

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  • Dimple
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Because there’s not enough support to build one like that Oceans are deeper than lakes and rivers

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