James asked in SportsCycling · 6 months ago

How would Wattage Output base itself with a lighter bike?

Update:

Example - a sprinting climb has an effort of 510W for 40sec and that bike weighs 20lbs

If a 15lb bike is pulling duty, are Strava Watts a factor of 25% less weight? Or, are wattage factors based off of a standard being something 33% heavier?? Or--would the two Bikes generate 17.5llb basis of comparison???

#powerfully confused #impartial #emotional

3 Answers

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Depends on what your other variables are doing. Usually, it is assumed that the power (what you call "wattage") is constant, as that depends mainly on the rider (with some fluctuations due to psychology and gear inches/rpm). Under that assumption, 5 pounds less system weight will give you a small increase in speed (or reduction in travel time).

  • 6 months ago

    Wattage output has nothing to do with how much a bike weighs. However, a lighter bike will go faster uphill than a heavier one if the rider puts out the same effort. Applications like Strava calculate wattage using information provided by the user.

    EDIT: Strava calculates power output by you according the the information that you input into the system. Therefore, if you ride a lighter bike and go faster Strava will assume that you are stronger unless you input information about the lighter bike. If you fail to account for the lighter weight Strava will assume that your power output has increased. What professional cyclists measure is power output per pound of rider weight. For climbing mountains this is the Holy Grail for performance. A rider who loses 10 pounds of body weight(or more) and maintains the same power output will automatically be able to go uphill faster. That rider is not any stronger, and does not increase power output. Watts per kilogram of body weight is the measure that professionals look at. Strava is a training tool that rely on the information that it receives. If your input to Strava does not include power output it will have to estimate power according to the other information that you provide. There is no magic solution that will allow Strava to accurately give wattage without that specific input.

    • Mtrlpqbiker
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      The bike is a small percentage of the total weight of the rider and bike together. A 25% weight saving of the bike alone is a tiny percentage of the combined weight of rider + bike

  • 6 months ago

    It's not only about a lighter bike. It could also be about a lighter you! I found this article from Cycling Weekly to be very interesting. https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/training/the...

    Basically, the lighter the bike (or a lighter you), wattage increases. So...is it worth going from a $1,000 road bike to a $5,000 road bike? Or would it be easier & more cost effective just to lose 5 pounds? 🤔 Hmmm... BTW...through a better diet & regular cycling, I've dropped over 100 lbs. I'm a hell-of-a-lot faster now with much more endurance.

    • Mtrlpqbiker
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      "Basically, the lighter the bike (or a lighter you), wattage increases" INCORRECT. Power to weight improves, but wattage does not increase

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