Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingPregnancy · 6 months ago

What is a dominant follicle and is it an embryo or an egg that has been fertilized, be not yet implanted?

Is a dominant follicle an embryo or a fertilized egg that has not yet been implanted? Does a dominant follicle mean the woman is pregnant or conception?

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  • MissA
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    A dominant follicle is neither of those things. It's a follicle (the pocket in the ovary in which your eggs grow) which is larger than the others because it is ready up to release an egg.

    Dominant follicles can be a problem in women doing IVF because they are trying to get several eggs to maturity at the same time rather than one that is much more mature. In women not doing IVF, this is basically normal. You really only want to have one egg released per cycle.

  • LizB
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    The dominant follicle is the one that is largest in size and most likely to release an egg. It is not fertilized yet because ovulation has not yet occured -- the follicular stage is between the first day of your period and ovulation. AFTER ovulation occurs and sperm meets egg then you have a fertilized egg, which becomes a zygote, then a morula, then a blastocyst. If the blastocyst successfully implants in the uterine wall, it becomes an embryo. The embryonic stage lasts until the 9th week of pregnancy.

    The follicle that released the egg continues to serve an important role, btw. After it releases the egg it becomes the corpus luteum, which pumps out progesterone in hopes that the egg will be fertilized and the conception will be viable. Once an embryo has implanted the placenta starts to grow, and it also produces progesterone needed to support the pregnancy. The corpus luteum makes progesterone as a stop-gap until there's a placenta to take over. If no pregnancy occurs and no placenta starts forming, progesterone levels drop, and that's what cues the body to shed endometrial lining (aka, your period) and start all over again.

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