Grange asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 6 months ago

Can you use both, past perfect and future simple in one sentence?

Update:

Can you use both, past perfect and future simple in one sentence?

This is the sentence for example:

"This would've saved us on that one crappy test we might have."

5 Answers

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  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    "I have often wondered when I will be able to afford a Ferrari."

    Edit....Ah...you mean plusperfect.... "I had often wondered if I will be able to afford a Ferrari." It doesn't sound right though.

    'Would have' is NOT plusperfect (past perfect)

    'Might have' is NOT future simple.

    • Lôn
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Dogtags.... ah, that makes sense.

  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    This would've saved us - (would have saved) -,conditional perfect (also called the "past" conditional). It's technically outside the tense system. would - is a modal helping verb, which in this case expresses the conditional mood. have saved -- express the perfect aspect (completed). The conditional perfect is used to describe the hypothetical result of a hypothetical condition in the past.

    on that one crappy test we might have (might have)-- outside the tense system. might - is another modal helping verb, indicating possibility. It is the imperfect aspect (not completed).

    The example sentence is not correct.

    The two possible corrections are:

    "This would save us on that one crappy test we might have". would save (conditional imperfect, sometimes incorrectly called the "present" conditional). , might have (imperfect aspect, no tense, might as modal of possibility)

    "This would have saved us on that one crappy test we had". would have save us (conditional perfect), had (simple past).

    past perfect = This had saved us. future = we will have.

    There is no such thing as "future simple". simple - in grammar, means "one". For a tense, that means a one word tense. The future in English is always compound. will + verb. simple - doesn't mean basic - in grammar.

    English has only two simple tenses:

    simple present: I have; It saves.

    simple past: I had; It saved.

    Any other tense/aspect/mood/voice combo is compound (in English).

    Note there are other present and past tenses that are not "simple". It does save; It is saving. It was saving. It has saved. It did save. etc.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    The example given by Anon does not use past perfect, it uses present perfect.

    You can't use both past perfect and future simple tense in one sentence. In that, your friend is right. But your sentence doesn't have either one.

  • 6 months ago

    Asker, your sentence doesn't include either of the tenses you mention. It is a Conditional sentence: 'would have saved', 'we might have'.

    But I have to tell you it doesn't make sense. You 'might' have a test. If you haven't already had the test, how could something HAVE SAVED you?

    Do you mean this might save you if you DO have the test?

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You can use both past perfect and future simple in one sentence: We had gone swimming before and we will go swimming again.

    Your example is not future simple.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Anon, 'have gone' is not Past Perfect; it is Present Perfect.

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