Can I collect unemployment fired for absenteeism?

Hey ppl.. I currently have 4 occurrences at Walmart and if I get to 5 I’m automatically terminated. It’s overnight and I’ve worked here for over 5 years now. But I’m about done. So my question is.. if I call out again and I’m terminated.. can I still collect unemployment until I get another job? I live in New York. If it matters. Thanks!

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  • 1 year ago

    The general rule is you are not eligible if you are fired for cause. Absenteeism is cause.

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  • 1 year ago

    Nothing to stop you from filing. But if Walmart contests you receiving benefits on the basis that you were fired for cause, and the reason for it, the state can deny you. If Walmart does not contest it, and they might not, because so many people come and go from that business, then you may be approved.

    If you were let go due to a store closure and there was no transfer available to you that was not an unreasonable distance away, you would not have a problem. The primary collectors of unemployment are those who are laid off. Quitting, never, and being fired, seldom.

    If the state approves you quickly, you may receive benefits before the process of the employer contesting the benefits is complete. If Walmart contests and the state overturns paying you benefits, they can demand back from you what was already paid. If you don't pay it back, you can kiss goodbye any state tax refunds you might have coming until the money is pad back.

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  • 1 year ago

    Termination for cause, e.g. excessive absenteeism, any violations of company policy, etc. disqualifies you for unemployment insurance. To qualify for UI, you must lose your job through no fault of your own, e.g. restructuring the company, eliminating positions/departments, reduction in staffing, company closure. You must also be available for & actively looking for full-time employment.

    If you're unhappy with your current job, perhaps it's time to start looking for another. Or assess prior absences & decide what to do to prevent any further absences.

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  • 1 year ago

    If you were fired or quit you don't get unemployment.

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  • 1 year ago

    no. If you were fired for cause, you cannot.

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  • 1 year ago

    Most of the people that are answering here have no clue.

    Yes. Pretty much, unless you were stealing or high on the job or just stopped showing up for work, you can collect unemployment. And sometimes even for those things.

    Try to do better, but if you do get fired, do apply for unemployment. See the link below for info on how to do that.

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    • STEVEN F
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      YOU are clueless. The state may actually VIOLATE the law and side with the FORMER employee, but BY LAW, they wouldn't be eligible in the case described.

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  • 1 year ago

    Of course not. If that's how it worked there wouldn't be unemployment benefits because they'd have gone bankrupt from a bunch of people deliberately getting fired so that they can get paid to not work.

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  • .
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    No.

    That's not the purpose of unemployment protection.

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  • 1 year ago

    No.

    Unemployment is for when you lose your job through no fault of you own.

    You have a job available to you. If you lose it, it will be because you didn't bother to go to work.

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  • 1 year ago

    No, you can't. You would have been fired for cause. You don't get unemployment when you get fired because you couldn't show up for work. That's your fault. You get unemployment when you are fired for something that isn't your fault.

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