Employment after a disability?

I had to resign my job a few years ago due to being diagnosed with cancer. Now that I’m better and able to work, it’s been tough finding employment within my degree as a teacher. I can get interviews but never selected. Potential employers see the gap in employment and think the worse or if I’m honest with them, I believe that they’re scared I may need time off if hired, but that’s not the case. What’s the best way to address the question of my gap of unemployment due to a disability without revealing I’ve had cancer?

9 Answers

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  • Katie
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    Cancer is an illness NOT a disability.

  • 6 months ago

    Two words: "Disability" and "more time off". Okay - Four words. Two issues. You were NOT disabled. You were recovering from a health issue - cancer. Don't use the word "disability". Second, make sure know that the cancer is gone. You are fully recovered. Of course, it can relapse, but that's another issue. If it is gone now and you are healthy and fine, don't be labeling yourself as having been disabled in the past. You quit for cancer treatment and to look after yourself. You have recovered and the cancer is gone.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Employment law experience.
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I think your best bet is to be honest with them.

  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    I agree with everyone else, you were never disabled you had cancer, you are now well. That will not stop you from getting a job.

    • Tavy
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Cancer is never called a disability in the UK. It is an illness.

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  • 6 months ago

    Let's review -- while technically you had a "disability," the reality is that you took a medical leave to battle cancer and you've been successful. While you never have to reveal your medical history, you may need to do so and you certainly should be clearer that you were not "disabled" as much as you had a medical condition that has now been successful resolved.

    It is against the law to discriminate against a real or perceived disability if the candidate is able to perform the job. If you have evidence that this is happening, hire a lawyer. Otherwise, apply to more job and apply to districts or schools that have a difficult time finding qualified candidates.

    Millions of school teachers have gaps in employment due to raising a family, so I'm not sure the gap is the real issue. Did you have a strong record before you had to step away from teaching? Do you have good recommendations from your previous employers? Have you been keeping up-to-date on teaching methodology, etc.?

    • SimplytheFACTS
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      don't count on ADA being enforced....lawyers are expensive, govt doesn't enforce it (EEOC is supposed to, but doesn't--they are idiots)...and unless there is proof, you have no chance....

  • 6 months ago

    don't lie, you can try to hide the truth by watering it down, but don't actually lie...if they catch you in an actual lie, that is grounds for firing...

    have you considered subbing? that will get you into the district...even an aide job to start...hopefully after a year, you will get a permanent position. As a sub, ask for long term positions such as maternity leave replacement.

    you never know, the person who interviews you may also be a survivor.....and the truth will help you get the job.

    yes it was a disability, but it doesn't need to be called a disability

  • 6 months ago

    You don't need to tell them that you were disabled.

    Teachers take time off for family reasons all the time. If you still live in the community where you previously taught, it would likely be easiest to get your job back in that district.

    If not there, do you have friends in other districts, that can provide references?

  • Jay
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    First of all, you do not have to tell anyone about your medical history.

    You can explain it by saying "I took some time off for personal growth."

    Then apply to teach in school systems that are desperate for teachers. Like a stint in West Virginia or Kentucky.

  • Eva
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Emphasize how long you have been cancer-free and that you're ready to return to full time employment. Be honest about why you were out of the work force, but don't call it a disability. You were in treatment, concentrating on your recovery. There is no shame in revealing that you had cancer.

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