What are the best fields of law for someone with Asperger's Syndrome?

I am a law student with Asperger's who finished his first year of law school. I am trying to figure out which field to specialize in. I am interning at a trust and estates firm and a criminal defense/personal injury firm. When dealing with clients I get extreme anxiety. What fields of law have the lowest level of client interaction and/or are the least conflict driven. Thank you all in advance.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Probably whatever their interest is in. If they have an area they’re an expert in like a lot of spectrum people do.

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  • 7 months ago

    My father has Aspergers and he was an expert in International Law and a law professor. He didn't have anxiety, he was never shy and he was confident, but he didn't notice when he was being socially inappropriate and after 23 years all the people that hated him in his department for not picking up on social clues forced him into early retirement against his will.

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  • 7 months ago

    There are lots of lawyers who work for the government and don't have any clients.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    We have trolls who have asked that a dozen or more times in the last few months.

    I have no idea. I just want to kill trolls.

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  • 7 months ago

    What's your undergrad degree in?

    It wouldn't be unusual to be an engineering undergrad and then to into patent law.

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  • 7 months ago

    Lots of those on the spectrum go into tax law. One of my daughters is a corporate tax lawyer and she is pretty much the only one in her group who is not on the spectrum to some degree.

    Another popular area is copyright law. Lots of engineering types go into that area,

    Unfortunately, if you make partner at a law firm you will have to manage people and talk to clients no matter what route you take. But you can become a corporate attorney or a judge at that point if you want to keep the pressure down and are ok earning less.

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  • 7 months ago

    If you want low conflict, then you go with a field that requires you to meet with a client only - such as estate planning/wills/trusts. However, as you can imagine, this entails a high level of interaction with the client to insure that you meet all their wishes. Most other law will require conflict (after all, it is suing someone or someone accused of something and being charged and tried). There is also one thing you probably haven't thought of - in many if not the vast majority of law firms, the way to move from associate to partner is to be a "rainmaker" - in order to do that, you have to meet with potential clients and convince them to use your firm.

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