Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHigher Education (University +) · 5 months ago

Should you pay for your child's college if they got terrible grades in high school?

Lets say that they graduated with a 2.3 GPA. Would paying for their college be a huge risk?

18 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Trade school would be better for them

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    My parents paid for my college tuition, and I was ranked near the bottom of my high school class. Had they not done so, I wouldn't be where I am now. I received the very first A's I'd ever had in MY LIFE during my freshman year of college, and once I got those, I never looked back.

  • 5 months ago

    Understand, "terrible grades" are unlikely to get the kid into any sort of college. Even community colleges have their standards, as low as they might be.

    So it might be more likely that the parents would be paying for technical school like electrician, plumber, HVAC, chef, etc. I list these as these blue collar jobs have the potential for earning big bucks comparable to what a college grad might earn. Aviation mechanics, for example, can earn over $75,000 per annum in the Oakland CA area.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    If you can afford it why not? Vocational school is expensive too. There’s also colleges with lower standards like tier 4 colleges. If they aren’t going to graduate school it’s better to get a degree with a c average than not have one these days. If they’re not smart enough they will flunk out anyway but at least you tried.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Should parents pay under any circumstance? Sure if they can afford it. If the student did poorly in HS, you could pay for a smaller portion of the expenses, or perhaps fund technical or vocational school, to shorten the process so they can work sooner and then pay their own way if they decide college is what they truly want.

  • 5 months ago

    No risk to you, just a waste of money. But I failed a grade in high school and wouldn't have graduated if I hadn't taken boys' chorus. I then went to college and graduated with a business degree. So there can be late bloomers. But I paid my own way, working two jobs.

    • oldprof
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      One of the big disappointments as Adjunct Faculty (which I did for many years) is to get a room full of students who don't really want to be there. They are there only because their parents or business said they had to be. On the flip side, it's a joy to teach students like you who want to learn.

  • 5 months ago

    They aren't going to college with grades like that. They don't have what it takes. If I were that kid's parent, I would help pay for a vocational training program at community college or trade school. Parents need to help launch their kids into some kind of occupation where they can support themselves.

    • oldprof
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      It's well-known that all other things equal, people with college degrees will earn more over their lifetime than those without such degrees. If the parents can afford it (which was specified) it would be worth the investment to let their kid at least try. Call it a probationary period.

  • 5 months ago

    I think you do it one semester at a time, starting with community college (because their high school grades don't justify spending the money to send them to a four-year university). If they do well and manage, say, a 3.0 GPA at community college, then you pay for the next semester. You also discuss alternatives with them -- trade school (in case they are better at working with their hands), the military or getting a job. Once they are working full-time, they should be paying some kind of rent to you to make it clear to them that they are now an adult and need to be paying their own way (at least partially).

    • oldprof
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Exactly...each term is a probationary period. The kid has to earn his way into the next term with passing grades.

  • mokrie
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    College would be a waste of money. Not everyone is meant for college. The child may be a great future electrician, plumber, builder, welder or other field that can be learned at a tech school or on the job training. They make good money and are busy most all the time.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    You signed up for it when you had a child

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.