Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelUnited StatesNew York City · 6 months ago

Why aren't American towns more walkable?

In Europe you can walk to everything you need. Pharmacy, movie theater, groceries, bars, corner store, clothing store, etc. In America you have to drive everywhere. Nothing is within walking distance. In Europe there are bike paths and side walks to take. Getting outside is good for your health and interacting with other people.

Update:

Having more space doesn't mean things can't be walkable.

21 Answers

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  • 6 months ago

    It just seems like everything in America is geared towards people being fat, unhealthy, decrepit, exercise aversive. You have to go to large metro areas like New York To find people who are not overweight, on 10 different prescription drugs, never get out of their SUVs to walk anywhere, always use drive-thru windows, or are dragging themselves around with walkers because mainstream cut-and-drug America doctors have destroyed their bodies with too many prescription drugs and multiple joint replacement surgeries, etc. Europeans just seem to be smarter, healthier in general. Better culture.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Capitalism. Some car-manufacture magnats bought up most of the public transportation and let it bleed to death. Cars and gasoline are more profitable

    Lots of places in Europe have strong lobbies for biking and walking because of population-density. If everybody would drive, they'd all get stuck in traffic-jams

  • drip
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    We have bike paths and sidewalks.

    The towns are larger. The town I grew up in had a wonderful downtown area. Very walkable. But our home was is a 15 minute drive away from it.

    Chicago is very walkable. It has many older neighborhoods that have their own walkable shopping areas.

    But town and older city

    Towns spreads out. Population grows. Not everyone can be with walking distance

  • 6 months ago

    American cities are more spaced out and more dependent on transportation to get places.

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  • 6 months ago

    Many towns and cities in USA were made after cars became mainstream. Henry Ford introduced mass-production technique on cars, resulting cars to become affordable enough by most people. In response to the growing popularity of cars, the American government envisioned the future to be filled with cars, so they started building new cities and towns where distance between places are relatively far from one another.

    On the other hand, in Europe, many cities and towns were made before cars even exist. As the result, most towns and cities in Europe are walkable enough.

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Actually, most towns and cities in the US were established before cars were invented. You may be thinking of suburbs.

  • 6 months ago

    I am in the US and I take the bus. This is time consuming, of course. And the other day a little boy, seeing me with a utility cart for shopping, asked me whether I have a house. Yes, I do. If I were the kind of person who worries about what people think, I suppose I would be in a pickle.

  • John
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If you want to go to the butcher, then the greengrocer, then the drug store and maybe catch lunch and a movie somewhere in there, just about any American town that still has a working downtown has that and more. Hundreds certainly and more likely thousands. If you think that people in Rome don't live in the suburbs and take buses or cars into the city center then you just haven't been there. Our Italian relatives certainly live in a small town and it is miles from their homes to downtown. It's quaint to imagine that they hitch up the horse to go for a gelato.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    America is young. Older cities are walkable. Newer suburbs are not. Those built after the automobile didn't think about making the places pedestrian-friendly, assuming people would drive everywhere. As a result, people have to drive everywhere. Or move to the city, which more and more are doing, in order to avoid having to pay for cars, gas, insurance etc.

  • Darren
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    As Skeptik pointed out, cites that grew before the automobile were walkable, while cities that grew after the invention of the car were more spread out. If you visit old cities in the United States (Boston, Philadelphia, Savannah, Charleston, etc.) you will find that their old sections are very walkable.

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      I've lived in Boston and Philadelphia, and I'm now in Chicago. I don't find Chicago any less walkable. In my part of the city, everything I need is within walking distance, and we have excellent public transportation to get anywhere else. My husband and I actually gave up our cars.

  • 6 months ago

    You clearly haven't spent much time in European cities.

    NEXT!!!!!

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