I smoked some from17 until 25. my early years I didn't do it much at all. Will my lungs get back to their original state?

Never got any diseases. Never really went hard at it because I didn't like it that much. Can't get any straight answers on the internet. Never got to a pack a day habit. Basically I quit because I thought it was dumb and I didn't get anything out of it. I also had like long breaks in between times when I would smoke at all in my later years. The only time I would consider myself a smoker was just a couple of years out of it and again I never got to a pack a day. I think because I didn't do it that much they can potentially become good as new. Another thing to note is that I didn't really inhale very deeply on the cigarettes either.

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It will be stable forever if you don't smoke. Definitely you can improve your overall health and possibly the lungs. Smoking for eight years won't cause any damage to your lungs. If it's lifelong, then it may have impact.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    You should be ok. But its never safe for anyone to smoke for 8 years and expect to be good as new the day you quit.

  • Sam
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    I smoked a pack a day from 16 and still smoke cigarettes (over 50 years) and still smoke cigarettes. The last chest x-ray I had about two months ago, looked fine, lungs clear.

    I asked, "How can that be"

    Doctor said, "You've been lucky, but don't push your luck, you should quit now."

    Someday I will... I want to quit.. it's a big waste of money.

    Source(s): But don't use anything I said to start smoking again. You might not be so lucky. They say it takes about a year for your lungs to be nice and pink again, but the healing starts as soon as you quit, after your last cigarette.
  • Lili
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    See the timeline below. Eventually, your chances of developing lung disease will be the same as those of people who never smoked -- that is, if you don't develop a problem in the meantime.

    About 93% of smokers never get lung cancer even if they don't quit. They can develop other smoking-related health problems, of course, but quitting greatly reduces the chances of that. You quit early in your life. You might carry a gene for health problems that smoking could have triggered (that's a problem for smokers; they don't know whether they are genetically disposed to something smoking could trigger), but given how early you quit, it's most likely that you won't develop any sort of smoking-related disease.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317956.p...

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 6 months ago

    My grandpa quit in his 40's and lived to 100. Perhaps he would have lived to 103? Found this link that answers it pretty good.

  • Lauren
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    Are you having any symptoms, like difficulty breathing, wheezing, etc.? You can always go to a doctor and talk to them about the situation, see if they recommend x-rays. That might give you peace of mind to see your lungs on an x-ray. You would at least know what you were working with at that point. X-rays don't show all types of damage but it would be a starting point and might answer your question for you. If no damage appears to be present, you are probably safe to continue without worrying about it.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Smoking causes irreversible damage to your lungs. Quitting will help to keep it from getting worse. I commend you for kicking the habit. 👍

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Actually, by about 20 years after quitting, a former smoker's chances of developing lung and heart disease are no greater than those of people who never smoked. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317956.php

  • 6 months ago

    No smoking causes permanent damage. They may get better somewhat but will never be smoke free lungs

    • Lili
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317956.php

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.