Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 6 months ago

English grammar?

Is this sentence correct?

1) Target has not yet achieved.

Thank you.

Update:

Can you guys explain a little more why this sentence is wrong instead of pointing out the mistake? Thanks

8 Answers

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  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You have many correct answers. Here's an explanation.

    achieve - requires a direct object. So, the target has not yet achieved - is incomplete. It would need a direct object (which doesn't make sense with "target").

    The target - is probably the direct object. He has not yet achieved the target. That's in active voice.

    It's possible tp make a direct object function as the subject, by putting it in passive. (the) Target has not yet been achieved (by him). The subject of a sentence in active voice becomes the agent in passive voice, but stating the agent is optional).

    The -- is not strictly required in front of "target" in this specific passive voice sentence, because it's commonly said in the military, which often removes unnecessary words (ones that are clear from context). This is a very rare exception. It does not apply to most other nouns (The goal has not yet been achieved. THE must be there).

    Note though that in active voice, most native speakers would say "the target".

    Source(s): studied linguistics and English grammar; native English speaker. four foreign languages to varying degrees of competency.
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It's called a sentence fragment.

    You need more words to make it a complete thought.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    1. "Target" needs a definite article [the target].

    2. This sentence needs to be in the passive voice. Targets do not achieve anything; they are achieved by the people who have set them. You can't leave a transitive verb dangling without a direct object.

    The target has not yet been achieved.

    OR

    The company has not yet achieved its target.

    In the same way, you can't simply say "He took" or "I sold" without a following direct object.

    • dogtags40
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Actually, in certain jargons (industrial, military, medical, law enforcement), some non-functional words are omitted, almost a short-hand version of the language. Omitting the article is VERY common.

  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    No...1) Target has not yet BEEN achieved.

    • John P
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Indeed: "The target has not yet been achieved" as a full sentence with indicative verb. As a shorthand note possibly "Target not yet achieved". But definitely not as you have written. "Targets" need to "be achieved" by people, "targets" are not things which can work by themselves.

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  • Rico
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Comma instead of period after achieved, one space before 'thank' (with a lower case t). End the sentence with a period

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    "The target has not yet been achieved."

    "The target was not achieved yet."

  • Dze
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    no, say - The target was not yet achieved.

  • Ann
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    Target has not yet BEEN achieved.

    • dogtags40
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Not necessarily, Land-shark. Omission of the article is common in 'reporting' or 'messaging', esp where brevity is an advantage.

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