Bee V2
Lv 6
Bee V2 asked in Food & DrinkBeer, Wine & Spirits · 8 months ago

What makes a drink a "beer"?

Bought some "beer" only to realize it's non alcoholic and basically just water, yeast, and hops. So what qualifies it as a beer, then? The hops? I thought a beer was a malt-y alcoholic hoppy water.

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  • james
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The blend of grains. & hops. I do not care much for rice beers as the main grain. Like in Japan. But red horse a 8% beer as rice brings up alcohol content. Is good with ice in it. A heavy beer made for ice. Some meads are 25% alcohol a for most more bitter beer. There are some interesting bread beers. So depends on were you are at. Also tempriture beer is made to be served at. Many beers are made to serve at around 55f. Were in America they like near froze beer. This has a lot to do with taste of the beer. Made for local taste.

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  • 7 months ago

    Some "non alcoholic beers" are brewed as normal beer then the alcohol removed by heating.

    That gives the end result a flavour nearer (arguably) to normal beer, that a type only brewed to a very low alcohol level.

    The commonest are alcohol-free versions of branded normal beers and lagers.

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  • 7 months ago

    As long as the label simply doesn't say beer (i.e it says Non-Alcoholic Beer) than they are fine.

    Section 5052(a) of the IRC (26 U.S.C. 5052(a)) defines the term “beer,” for

    purposes of Chapter 51, as “beer, ale, porter, stout, and other similar fermented

    beverages (including saké or similar products) of any name or description containing

    one-half of 1 percent or more of alcohol by volume, brewed or produced from malt,

    wholly or in part, or from any substitute therefor.” Essentially the same definition

    appears in the TTB regulations at 27 CFR 25.11. In addition, with reference to what

    may be a substitute for malt, § 25.15(a) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 25.15(a)) states

    that “[o]nly rice, grain of any kind, bran, glucose, sugar, and molasses are substitutes

    for malt.”

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  • 7 months ago

    Fermented grain.

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  • 8 months ago

    Drinks with less than 0.5% alcohol are considered non-alcoholic. Fruit juice will usually have this small trace as well, especially if they have been open for a while. What you had was dealcoholised beer. Also, drinks such as ginger beer are normally non-alcoholic.

    • oikoσ
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Ginger beer can be slightly alcoholic, on the order of 1-2%.

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  • CB
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Root Beer, Ginger Beer, usually non-alcoholic. But I feel you brother NonAlc should be prominent on the label.

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  • 8 months ago

    Beer is made from malt, hops, yeast and water. Yeast is what generates the alcohol via the fermentation process. The malt is the sugar component that the yeast converts to alcohol. Traditionally the malt is derived from barley, however now they use all sorts of grains and flavor additives to create different taste profiles.

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  • Jeremy
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    In the broadest sense, beer is any alcoholic beverage made with the fermentation of grain, where wine is made with fermentation of fruit. Hard liquors can come from either, but are also distilled.

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    • Mithter T-Reckth
      Lv 6
      8 months agoReport

      @Bee V2 most if not all non-alcoholic beer contains some small amount of alcohol. A beer that has 0.5% alcohol is still considered a non-alcoholic beer

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  • 8 months ago

    Beer is generally fermented barley mash (including the alcohol). But I suppose they wanted to keep the name in order to sell the non-alcoholic variety. However, non-alcoholic beer does have a very small amount of alcohol in it, just not very much (so I suppose it is still technically "beer", even though it isn't the true spirit of beer, pardon the pun).

    P.S. - The hops are optional (hops are added to help with preservation and some people like the taste but you can make beer without it). Beer was made for a long time before people figured out that if you add hops it keeps longer.

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    • oikoσ
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Not every beer is ale or lager. There are 11 mixed styles, including steam beer, barleywine, and Oktoberfest. And beer without hops is gruit, not ale.

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Its the fermentation process.

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