My daughters story?

So I’ve just been cleaning up my 10 year olds bedroom when I come across a writing pad, I quickly read what’s on the first page out of interest to quickly realise she’s wrote a story. Intrigued, I read it. Anyway, the stormy goes.. (key points) a young girl having a baby, she struggles for money, the dad is unknown, she has another baby & still struggling for money she considers adoption, the boy grows up to get young girl pregnant at only 15. The words are so beautifully written but it’s sad at the same time. Anyway my daughter is only 10, to me this seems unusual for her to writing such stories. Ive been with her dad since before she was born (obviously) and she’s never seen us struggle so I’m not really sure where she’s got this from. Would you bring it up with her? I’m truly impressed with her writing skills and would love to encourage it!

16 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Could she have copied it? Is it part of her homework? I wouldn't say anything, she'll feel she can't trust you if she knows you've been snooping.

  • B
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    No way should you admit to snooping, under any circumstances, and also best to stop snooping.

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    I wouldn't bring it up to her, but be sure to encourage her interest in writing if you see an opportunity! (I.e., if she asks you to proofread an essay, tell her you think she's a fantastic writer, or if you hear her telling a story, tell her she's a very engaging storyteller, etc..)

    I wrote a lot when I was younger too. My parents have been stable and together since before I was born, but kids hear and see things outside the home, it's not unusual for them to be specifically drawn to darker topics (not that kids themselves are dark, just that at 10, I was just starting to realize how dark the world can be and was very confused by it. Writing was a way of expressing that confusion.)

  • Lili
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I wrote a lot of stories in my elementary school years, but I preferred that my parents not read them. (On reason was that my father was a professional writer, so I was self-conscious about the quality of my prose compared with his.)

    I think you need to stay out of this for the time being, and don't read any more writing that you find in your daughter's room. If she is serious about writing, she will continue to do it into her middle-school and high school years and might start submitting to her school's literary magazine of something similar. At that point, you can comment.

    What you CAN do is encourage reading and ask her opinion of the writing in the books she reads. You can also recommend books you think she would like by saying things like, "I think the writing and the plotting in this one are particularly good." She may be encouraged to ask you what you mean. You might have a discussion about writing styles and plotting issues.

    But do NOT tell her that you read her story.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I was done after the snooping around your stepdaughter's room part.

    • samantha7 months agoReport

      1. I wasn’t snooping at all, I was tidying up & rearranging her bits & bobs
      2. She’s not my stepdaughter, she’s my biological daughter.

  • 7 months ago

    The best way to encourage her is to let her get on with it by herself in her own way. DON'T tell her you've invaded her privacy, don't hint, don't drop teasing remarks. Just act as if it never happened.

  • Zac Z
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I think it's great that you want to encourage her. Everybody likes praise, I suppose, and so will your daughter. She'll probably be happy to hear that you think that her writing's impressive and you're proud of her.

    But here's the thing. I don't know your daughter and how she'll react when she learns that you read her stuff. For me, an important point is what you mean by "I come across a writing pad". Was this pad open, I mean, was the page that caught your attention visible? In that case, just tell her what you told us. That you were cleaning and the text caught your eye and you kept reading because it was so good.

    However, if this writing pad was more like a diary as some suggest here, she might be angry with you to have pried into her personal things. This obviously depends on how your daughter thinks, your relationship with her, etc. It might be better to leave it be and not mention. That's for you to judge.

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    I'm not a fan of this invasion of her privacy.

    She's seen TV and movies, read books, talked to classmates and friends, and has an imagination. There's no reason to think anything is wrong because she wrote this story.

    What's wrong is your violation of her trust.

    • Josh7 months agoReport

      No not really she's just being a parent

  • joedlh
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Don't make the assumption that your daughter's writing is autobiographical. It is true the many writers start out by writing about themselves and many never do make it out of the memoir stage. Perhaps your daughter is an exception, given that she can create an entirely new plot and characters from her own imagination. That puts her one-up on most aspiring writers. Why don't you try to (slowly) encourage her interest in writing by bringing up in conversation how much you admire writers. She's a little young to attend workshops, which generally appeal to adult writers. However, your library might know of some resources for young writers.

  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    No, not unless she shows it to you.

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