Tony asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 7 months ago

At what altitude did WW I biplanes dog fight?

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    No set altitude so question a waste of time trying to make up rubbish about things most of the Arm Chair imaginary pilots here have never done!

  • 7 months ago

    Anything from just above the ground to as high as they could fly.

  • Fred
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Generally under 10.000 feet as over that the planes started to struggle as there were no superchargers or turbo chargers then and the engines struggled to get enough air to perform properly. Also pilots struggled to get enough oxygen to breathe so their abilities were inhibited.

    Early on in the war planes were used as reconnaissance scouts and needed to fly at a height they could clearly see what was happening on the ground so likely were no more than at 5,000 feet. Then these planes started to be attacked so needed fighter escorts that could fly even higher to get the jump on anyone trying to attack the scout plane. British planes were needed to fight off the super high flying Zeppelins bombing London. Germany had developed very light high flying Zeppelins before the end of the war which could fly up to as high as 21,000 feet and were hard for the normal fighters to reach.

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Mostly between 10,000 and sea level. There was no set altitude because of the difference in performance of aircraft (like an early WWI fighter that was barely able to fly to begin with to high performance aircraft that were designed to combat high altitude zeppelins); as well as the different combat scenarios (how much time was available to climb to altitude, how much altitude was sacrificed for performance, weather, etc etc).

    Most WWI fighters did not have boosted engines, which meant they had about 2/3 of their power at 10,000 feet. Most WWI aviators did not have oxygen, so would feel the effects of partial pressure hypoxia. Flying very low would give you better performance, but lower endurance due to the higher fuel consumption and you are vulnerable to obstacles and ground fire as well has have no altitude to trade for speed to pursue or escape.

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Usually somewhere close to the other airplane.

  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    With all the turning and diving there was no set altitude; the combat could take place anywhere from the treetop level up to about 10,000 feet. Pilots at the time tended to stay low because they used landmarks such as railroads, rivers, towns, forests to navigate.

    The World War 1 aerial combat wasn't practical at altitudes higher than 10,000 feet anyway. If they went higher than 10,000 feet after a while the crew would start getting incapacitated from the lack of oxygen especially when pulling high G maneuvers. Also, piston engines loose their performance with altitude.

  • 7 months ago

    Interesting

  • 7 months ago

    Under 10,000 feet. Anything higher and the engines that were used wouldn't perform to their maximum ability because of the lower oxygen content of the air. At times they would be as low as 100-300 feet off the ground as well.

    • Anon
      Lv 5
      7 months agoReport

      Probably going too fast and furious, dodging bullets and shrapnel, trying to control and not stall; so couldn't always have a detailed , accurate account of average altitude.

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