Marvin
Lv 7
Marvin asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 9 months ago

Fictional character type?

I have an idea for a science fiction story. There plot requires that the protagonist speak to a "mentor" who nobody else sees. The "mentor" is the deceased spirit image of his favorite social science instructor his university days (looks a lot like Morgan Freeman).

The "mentor" offers moral guidance, and helps him brainstorm.

The sessions with the mentor will work something like a "flashback". What do you call the type of character the "mentor" represents?

7 Answers

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  • 9 months ago

    A phantom, perhaps.

    Try WordHippo; they have one of the best resources for these problems I've seen so far.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    It's called a "Sleshbrebble."

  • Marli
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    "Mentor", "Sage", "Teacher", "Guide", "Guru" or "Wisdom Helper" are names given to the same character type, depending on what writing teacher is assigning categories. The Mentor is the wise teacher who guides the student along his or her path to enlightenment and knowledge, including self-knowledge.

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  • 9 months ago

    I don't see why you need a name for this kind of character. It just IS what it is, it does what it does. But if you do need a name, what's wrong with 'mentor'?

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  • Why do you need to name it?

    I just finished as book where the protagonist talks to a poster of Tony Hawk, who offers him life advice, I haven't needed to name this.

    Now if it is is just flashbacks, make the pages all squiggly so we know it is.

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  • Amber
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    If you do it well then I see no problem with it. I didn't understand your question though.

    What do you call the type of character the "mentor" represents?

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  • 9 months ago

    I've seen it work in other books.

    Four or five years ago, I read two in fairly rapid successions, just by chance. In one, a character communicated with Ernest Hemingway, and in the other, Albert Einstein.

    Of course, like any other device, a lot depends on how well it's executed. But I certainly wouldn't let the oddness of the concept stop me.

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