When did the US become "friends" with the UK?

This perplexes me. I have tried to research it on my own but have come up empty. The British American Colonies gained independence after the Revolutionary War. Then the British attacked the newly formed United States in 1812, going as far as ransacking and burning the capital city. Then, by the 20th century, the two arch enemies became close allies and fought not one but two major wars side by side. ?!?!? Huh? Quite frankly, if the two countries had remained enemies, the first major war would have ended differently and the second wouldn't have happened - IMHO.

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  • 7 months ago

    The most notable sign of a warming in Anglo-American relations was Britain's support during the Spanish–American War in 1898. Britain had previously favored Spanish control over Cuba, because the possession of Cuba by an unfriendly United States might harm British trade in the Caribbean. However, with the warming of Anglo-American relations and a guarantee of Cuban independence by the U.S. in 1898, Britain abandoned this policy and supported America's position on Cuba and the war. Officially Britain was neutral. At the same time, Washington refused to give support for the Boers in the Second Boer War. At the start of the Spanish–American War, most Continental European powers remained neutral and cool though warning Spain repeatedly not to provoke a war with the more powerful U.S. Britain also remained neutral but openly sided with America. During the 90-day war, Britain sold coal to the U.S. Navy and allowed the U.S. military to use Britain's submarine communications cables to communicate. When Commodore Dewey's fleet sailed out of Hong Kong's harbor for Manila, the British soldiers and sailors in the harbor unabashedly cheered for them

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    after 1902/04

  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    7 months ago

    The change is largely due to Woodrow Wilson's pro-British policies

  • Mike
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Rich Americans in the late 19th century admired what they perceived as the classiness of upper class Brits. They sent their daughters to GB to see if they could marry a nobleman and bring reflected glory to the American family. A Bronx family named Jerome, for instance, sent their daughter, Jennie, over and she married a Lord Churchill. The Brits had titles but welcomed the infusions of American cash to their depleted family coffers. During the Boer Wars, the common Americans identified with the embattled Dutch farmers who resisted the British army as the American farmers had a century earlier. British propagandists began cajoling the Americans with sweet comparisons between the two countries that shared the common heritage of the English language, and Shakespeare and Wordsworth. They suggested that America was safe because the mighty British navy deterred any foreign threats to either country. If the Boers prevailed, that would diminish British prestige and some unfriendly nation might be emboldened enough to challenge them. Some American papers took up this line of reasoning and pro-Boer sentiment never had any practical effects. When WWI began, the talk of the shared heritage was played at a loud volume and contrasted with the apelike, barbarous enemy that spoke in a coarse guttural language and wrote in scary Gothic letters. The American leaders were almost completely of British descent and longed to ingratiate themselves with their cousins. To this end, the official US policy of "neutrality" consisted entirely of lip service to the principle and concealed a significant bias in favor of the Allies. Even so, it took nearly 3 years before the Germans could be sufficiently goaded into "anti-American" measures that turned the popular opinion in favor of war. And so was born the special relationship between the two English speaking countries that has seemingly endured to this day.

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  • blu
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The UK was sympathetic to the US Confederacy during the Civil War although it officially remained neutral during the conflict.

    The US was strongly isolationist w/ the onset of WW1. When the German U-boat U-20 sank the British liner Lusitania on 7 May 1915 with 128 US citizens aboard, Wilson demanded an end to German attacks on passenger ships, and warned that the US would not tolerate unrestricted submarine warfare in violation of international law and of human rights.

    I would consider this event significant in establishing the UK and US as allies.

  • 7 months ago

    No. Only 13 of the 40 some British colonies revolted in 1776. The rest remained British, hence places like Canada. Which was attacked by the USA in 1812, the Americans thinking that the Canadians would welcome "liberation" from the Brits. They were wrong - the Canadian Militia fought back pretty hard, and it was they who sacked Washington.

    They had become allies by WWI - albeit reluctantly for the USA. Again in WWII, but, still reluctantly, although not as much as in WWI. By the time the war had ended, the UK, and USA were pretty much friends, and this friendship has grown since then. Canada became a country of it's own, independent of the UK, and Canada is actually the USA's closest ally, and friend.

  • RR
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    History is full of countries that were enemies becoming friends and vice versa. Japan was an ally of UK and USA in WW1 but a deadly enemy in WW2. Now it's friendly again.

    France and England were at war on and off for centuries but were allies in WW1 and WW2.

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    The British/Canadians did not attack the US in 1812, more like the reverse.

    They became friendly when British individuals started investing heavily in the US – look into the history of the railroads.

  • Luke
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    After the Civil War

  • Kenny
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I guess having formidable common enemies would bring people closer together .

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