John asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 7 months ago

Supposedly my Americanized last name Billings came from Bolsavice ( BALsuhVeeCheh). Can anyone verify the existence of this italian surname?

5 Answers

Relevance
  • 7 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    I agree that it sounds Slavic. It may have originally been a name that ended in -vich, -vitch, -vits or even -itz that was altered to sound more Italian. There was a fair amount of migration between what are now Austria, Croatia, Slovenia and northeastern Italy.

    • John7 months agoReport

      There is some russian in my lineage so the slavic note makes sense. Nevertheless it seems like my original family name is lost to the past. The name ended in the 1800s but apparently that is too long ago for any of my survivng family to remember, recall or care. Much thank everyone.

  • 7 months ago

    The link below is an Italian site where you can search for any surname and find how many people with that surname live in each region of Italy. It finds NO entries for "Bolsavice" at all. So it doesn't seem to be an Italian name, and in any case I agree with L E Gant that it sounds more Slavic than Italian.

    It seems therefore that something has been garbled in your family tradition: either the original surname was something different, or the country of origin was.

  • 7 months ago

    With the "exact spelling" box checked,

    https://familysearch.org/search/

    (the largest free genealogy site in the English-speaking world) has NO records for it. By comparison they have over 150,000 for "Pack", which I know from personal experience is uncommon, and over 28,000,000 for "Smith". If you want to check, you'd have to register, but, again, it is free and they don't spam you.

    Ancestry.com doesn't have any records for it either.

    Google had three results for it, two in Romanian, one in Portuguese. I could not tell if it was a surname on any of them.

  • 7 months ago

    "bolsavice" sounds more like a Slavic name, perhaps even Polish that have been Italianized.

    Just after the beginning of the 20th century, America (and other countries) had a huge number of immigrants, Often, the immigration people had difficulty spelling the "foreign" names, and would shorten them to fit the papers to legalize the immigration process. So, you're a little bit lucky -- amazing how many "Smiths", and "Jones" and "Browns" came into the States and Canada right up to WWII, and even after....

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 7 months ago

    Any likeness thereof?

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.