Lala asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 7 months ago

During world war ii , the allied invasion of france on D-day (june 6,1994) was significant because it?

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  • 7 months ago

    1944 was the D-day I remember

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Not that significant more too little to late the USA was ready in 1943

    but was making too much money out of the Nazis they wanted the war to end in 1950

  • Fred
    Lv 5
    7 months ago

    It was significant because it did not fail! It was carefully masqueraded as a rouge to lure the German forces away from Northern Calais when the intent was using Normandy as the central invasion point. Great efforts were made to support a false belief that Calais would be used as the 'main' invasion point. Hitler was completely bamboozled and withheld reserve forces away for some 16 days fearing a second invasion at Calais. Had Hitler not taken the bait (or a nap) the Allied invasion may have been thrown back upon the sea!

    It may (?) (did) inspire the Stauffenberg failed assassination attempt? It was significant in that assassination attempt led to the removal of competent German military leaders and a shift of German military decisions placed into Hitler' s hands... one of the worst moves in German defense and outcome in a failing war.

    It was of great significance that it split German home land defense into a two front war and allowed the Soviets time to build their invasion forces to full strength and opportunity.

  • Who
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    It kept the germans occupied in the west while russia was kicking the sh//t out of it in the east

    the start of the end for germany certainly WASNT D Day

    The start of the end of germany was the battle of kursk 1 year earlier in 1943

    After that battle they never stopped retreating

    (and kursk was before the US airforce got into the war proper by actually attacking germany

    before then they had only attacked "easy" targets in the west of europe (france, belgium, holland) with full fighter cover

    I am not decrying the huge difference they made- but by far most of their efforts came after kursk (well after) when germany was already retreating)

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      7 months agoReport

      U.S. 1st bombed targets in Germany on 27 Jan. '43. It continued to do so until the 14 Oct. '43 raid on Schweinfurt. Losses then were so heavy that it suspended raids until Feb. '44, when the P-51 fighter was able to escort for the full mission.

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  • Fred
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    The D-Day invasion of Normandy on the French coast on the 6th of June 1944 was the beginning of the western allies fight in Europe. Stalin of Russia had been demanding that the US and British Commonwealth forces open up a western front in Europe as until D-Day Russia had largely been the only ones in Europe directly fighting the Germans on the ground. The Russians were taking huge casualties and desperate for the western front to open up forcing the Germans to withdraw some of its forces to send to the western front.

    The D-Day invasion was the start of the end for Germany. They were actually fighting on 3 fronts as many forget the western allies were fighting German forces up the Italian peninsular capturing Rome on the same day as the Normandy landings so received little recognition. Germany was stretched to the limit trying to fight on 3 fronts and struggled to supply war needs to its troops as British and US bombers bombed its factories into oblivion. Likely D-Day was the time Germany's hopes were doomed as it could no longer cope with the number of well supplied troops fighting against them.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      7 months agoReport

      West Allies fought in Europe since the 10 Jul. '43 Sicily invasion. On 5 Jun' '44., it had 2 armies of 9 corps & 37 divisions in Italy. The U.S.S.R. (NOT "Russia") complaint was invalid. Normandy wasn't "the beginning of the end" for Germany. It lost more in the Soviet summer offensive.

  • 7 months ago

    Although the term D-Day is used routinely as military lingo for the day an ... for many it is also synonymous with June 6, 1944, the day the Allied powers ... the liberation of Western Europe from Nazi control during World War II.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      7 months agoReport

      West Europe wasn't liberated in one day. When the war ended on 9 May '45, Norway, Denmark & much of the Netherlands were still in German control.

  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    I think you mean 1944, look it up.

  • 7 months ago

    The D-Day is the day when USA began helping the Allies in Europe against Nazi Germany. Thanks to USA's army population and manufacturing power, the Allies were able to liberate Western Europe from German occupation and defeated Germany.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      7 months agoReport

      ACTUALLY, the U.S. began helping in Europe with the bombing of a French rail yard on 17 Aug. '42 & participation of 50 U.S. Rangers in the Dieppe Raid on 19 Aug. '42.

  • 7 months ago

    It was the beginning of the end of Nazi Germany.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 6
      7 months agoReport

      No, it wasn't. That could only be said after the failure of its Dec. '44 Ardennes offensive.

  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    The invasion of Normandy was and still is the largest amphibious invasion in the history of war.

    • Fred
      Lv 5
      7 months agoReport

      Just a personal opportunity to butt in: Had the opportunity fallen to MacArthur that title would fall to the Invasion of (home islands) Japan!

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