Is it too much that a Holocaust museum employs much "sound and light" ways?

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Not if that encourages the audiences to attend and learn

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    No. There is a very great deal of professional expertise in constructing a succesful theme park. It involves psychology, marketing skills, knowledge of child development and crowd management. The 'viking world' exhibition in York involves realistic medieval passages, smells, sounds and exactly the right amount of stimuli to allow children and adults to each absorb 'info-experience' units at a pace that will let them register, but not overwhelm.

    A holocaust feature, such as the one in the Vienna funfair, the ' "Wurstelprater" - can be a major crowd draw, or it can fail in the same way as some dull museum exhibit to which children are herded on a school trip. Animatronics and a 'cattle truck' ride combine to give the thrill of a ghost train, with the educational benefit of 'Schindler's list, but in a much shorter time scale.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    With the advent of the Internet, the Holohoaxers are finding it harder and harder to find support when the truth of what really happened is so easily available and people are opening their eyes. As with any other business, it's all about promotion.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Not at all. The Children's Memorial in a cavern at Yad Vashem, designed by architect Moshe Safdie, movingly uses candles and mirrors against a a roll call soundtrack to commemorate the 1.5 million children who were murdered in the Holocaust.

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